Wholeness and implicate order: “Deep” quantum chemistry and cell consciousness: quantum chemistry controls genes and biochemistry to give cells and higher organism’s consciousness and complex behavior

Bohm used the term ‘holomovement’ which is an unbroken and undivided totality and carries an implicate order which is he totality of an order including both the manifested and non-manifested aspects of the order. Non-local quantum phenomena reside in a subtler level than quantum level that is th

[ read more ]

Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life

Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling is being of vital imp

[ read more ]

Implications of quantum metabolism and natural selection for the origin of cancer cells and tumor progression

Energy transfer in material solids is driven primarily by differences in intensive thermodynamic quantities such as pressure and temperature. The crucial observation  in quantum-theoretical models was the consideration of the heat capacity as associated with the vibrations of atoms in a crystalline

[ read more ]

A Mitochondrial Paradigm of Metabolic and Degenerative Diseases, Aging, and Cancer: A Dawn for Evolutionary Medicine

Progressive increase in mtDNA 3243A>G heteroplasmy causes abrupt transcriptional reprogramming Wallace hypothesized mitochondrial dysfunction as a central role in a wide range of age-related disorders and various forms of cancer. Steadily rising increases in mitochondrial DNA mutations cause abr

[ read more ]

Quantum Teleportation and Von Neumann Entropy

From the aspect of the quantum information theories, various quantum entropies are possibly computed at each stage, which ensures the emergence of the entangled states in the intermediate step. If a single qubit quantum teleportation is near the computational basis, the quantum measurement is domina

[ read more ]

Variation in cancer risk among tissues can be explained by the number of stem cell divisions

Tomasetti and Vogelstein show that the lifetime risk of cancers of many different types is strongly correlated with the total number of divisions of the normal self-renewing cells maintaining that tissue’s homeostasis. These results suggest that only a third of the variation in cancer risk among t

[ read more ]

About metabolism of a carcinoma cell

Most cancer cells utilize aerobic glycolysis irrespective of their tissue of origin. The alteration from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis – called the Warburg effect – is an universal phenomen and has now become a diagnostic tool for cancer detection. Warburg O, Posener K, Negelein E.

[ read more ]

Mitochondria and the evolutionary roots of cancer

Cancer is a group of almost 200 diseases that involve variety of changes in cell structure, morphology, and physiology. Cancer phenotype is underlying several alterations in cellular dynamics with three most critical features, which includes self-sufficiency in growth signals and insensitivity to in

[ read more ]

Quantum entanglement between the electron clouds of nucleic acids in DNA

Rieper, Anders and Vedral modelled the electron clouds of nucleic acids in a single strand of DNA as a chain of coupled quantum harmonic oscillators with dipole-dipole interaction between nearest neighbours. As a main result, the entanglement contained in the chain coincides with the binding energy

[ read more ]

A new theory of the origin of cancer: quantum coherent entanglement, centrioles, mitosis, and differentiation

Low non-specific, low intensity laser illumination (635, 670 or 830 nm) apparently enhances centriole replication and promotes cell division, what is the opposite of a desired cancer therapy. In the contrary, centrioles are sensitive to coherent light. Then higher intensity laser illumination - stil

[ read more ]

Meldungen aus der Wissenschaft

DGTHG verleiht St.-Jude-Medical-Preis für besondere Forschungsleistungen der Herzmedizin

17. Feb. 2018

Wissenschaftliche Fachgesellschaft Deutscher Herzchirurgen verleiht St.-Jude-Medical-Preis für besondere Forschungsleistungen der Herzmedizin. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

DGTHG verleiht Hans Georg Borst-Preis für besondere Forschungsleistung der Herzmedizin

17. Feb. 2018

Wissenschaftliche Fachgesellschaft Deutscher Herzchirurgen verleiht Hans Georg Borst-Preis für besondere Forschungsleistung der Herzmedizin. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

DGTHG verleiht Gefäßchirurgischen Forschungspreis

17. Feb. 2018

Wissenschaftliche Fachgesellschaft Deutscher Herzchirurgen verleiht Gefäßchirurgischen Forschungspreis für besondere wissenschaftliche Leistungen der Herzmedizin. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

DGTHG verleiht Franz-Köhler-Preis für besondere Forschungsleistungen der Herzmedizin

17. Feb. 2018

Wissenschaftliche Fachgesellschaft Deutscher Herzchirurgen verleiht Franz-Köhler-Preis für besondere Forschungsleistungen der Herzmedizin. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

DGTHG und Deutsche Stiftung für Herzforschung verleihen Dr. Rusche-Forschungsprojekt-Preis

17. Feb. 2018

Wissenschaftliche Fachgesellschaft Deutscher Herzchirurgen und Deutsche Stiftung für Herzforschung verleihen Dr. Rusche-Forschungsprojekt-Preis für besondere Forschungsleistungen der Herzmedizin. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Forscherteam deckt die entscheidende Rolle des Enzyms PP5 bei Herzinsuffizienz auf

16. Feb. 2018

Ein internationales Forscherteam um Prof. Wolfgang Linke vom Institut für Physiologie ll der Universität Münster hat gezeigt: Bei Patienten mit Diastolischer Herzinsuffizienz ist zu viel des Enzyms PP5 im Herzen vorhanden. Das Enzym hemmt die „Titin-Federn“, die eine wichtige Rolle bei der Kontraktion der Herzmuskelzellen spielen. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Living City: Eine App für mehr Lebensqualität in Ulm und Neu-Ulm

16. Feb. 2018

Stau, überfüllte Busse und zu wenig Parkplätze wirken sich in Großstädten auf die Gesundheit der Menschen aus. Bis 2050 wird sich diese Situation verschärfen, denn dann leben laut Prognosen der Vereinten Nationen 66 Prozent der Menschen weltweit in Großstädten. Im Forschungsprojekt „Living City“ entwickeln Professoren des Instituts für Dienstleistungsmanagement digitale Lösungen für eine bessere Lebensqualität in der Doppelstadt Ulm/Neu-Ulm. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Beiträge

Mitochondria and the evolutionary roots of cancer

23. Feb. 2015

Cancer is a group of almost 200 diseases that involve variety of changes in cell structure, morphology, and physiology. Cancer phenotype is underlying several alterations in cellular dynamics with three most critical features, which includes self-sufficiency in growth signals and insensitivity to inhibitory signals, evasion of programmed cell death and limitless replicative potential with a potential for the invasion of other organs. Cancer disease is widespread among metazoans. Some properties of cancer cells such as uncontrolled cell proliferation, lack of apoptosis, hypoxia, fermentative metabolism and free cell motility, i.e. metastasis, resemble a prokaryotic lifestyle, which leads to the assumption of a reversal like evolution from eucariotic back to proteobacterial state. This phenotype matches the phenotype of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) that resulted from the endosymbiosis between archaebacteria and α-proteobacteria, which later became the mitochondria.

 Davila AF and Zamorano P (2013) Mitochondria and the evolutionary roots of cancer. Phys. Biol. 10 (2013) 026008, doi:10.1088/1478-3975/10/2/026008

About metabolism of a carcinoma cell

23. Feb. 2015

Most cancer cells utilize aerobic glycolysis irrespective of their tissue of origin. The alteration from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis – called the Warburg effect – is an universal phenomen and has now become a diagnostic tool for cancer detection.

Warburg O, Posener K, Negelein E. (1924) Über den Stoffwechsel der Carcinomzelle. Biochem Z. 152, 309–344.

A Mitochondrial Paradigm of Metabolic and Degenerative Diseases, Aging, and Cancer: A Dawn for Evolutionary Medicine

23. Feb. 2015
Progressive increase in mtDNA 3243A>G heteroplasmy causes abrupt transcriptional reprogramming

Wallace hypothesized mitochondrial dysfunction as a central role in a wide range of age-related disorders and various forms of cancer. Steadily rising increases in mitochondrial DNA mutations cause abrupt shifts in diseases. Discrete changes in nuclear gene expression in response to small increases in DNA mutant level are analogous to the phase shifts that is well known in physics: As heat is added, the ice abruptly turns to water or with more heat abruptly to steam. Therefore, a quantitative change that is an increasing proportion of mitochondrial DNA mutation results in a qualitative change  which coordinate changes in nuclear gene expression together with discrete changes in clinical symptoms.

 Wallace DC (2005) A Mitochondrial Paradigm of Metabolic and Degenerative Diseases, Aging, and Cancer: A Dawn for Evolutionary Medicine. Annu Rev Genet. 2005 ; 39: 359. doi:10.1146/annurev.genet.39.110304.095751

Picard M et. Al (2014) Progressive increase in mtDNA 3243A>G heteroplasmy causes abrupt transcriptional reprogramming. PNAS E4033–E4042, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1414028111

Variation in cancer risk among tissues can be explained by the number of stem cell divisions

23. Feb. 2015

Tomasetti and Vogelstein show that the lifetime risk of cancers of many different types is strongly correlated with the total number of divisions of the normal self-renewing cells maintaining that tissue’s homeostasis. These results suggest that only a third of the variation in cancer risk among tissues is attributable to environmental factors or inherited predispositions. The majority is due to bad luck, that is, random mutations arising during DNA replication in normal, noncancerous stem cells.

Tomasetti C, Vogelstein B (2015): Variation in cancer risk among tissues can be explained by the number of stem cell divisions. Science 2 January 2015: Vol. 347 no. 6217 pp. 78-81 DOI: 10.1126/science.1260825

Implications of quantum metabolism and natural selection for the origin of cancer cells and tumor progression

23. Feb. 2015

Energy transfer in material solids is driven primarily by differences in intensive thermodynamic quantities such as pressure and temperature. The crucial observation  in quantum-theoretical models was the consideration of the heat capacity as associated with the vibrations of atoms in a crystalline solid. However, living organisms are essentially isothermal. Because of very little differences in temperature between different parts of a cell it is assumed that energy flow in living organisms is mediated by differences in the turnover time of various metabolic processes in the cell, which occur in cyclical fashion. It has been shown that the cycle time of these metabolic processes is related to the metabolic rate, that is the rate at which the organism transforms the free energy of whatever source into metabolic work, maintenance of constant temperature and structuraland functional organization of the cells. Quantum Metabolism exploits the methodology of the quantum theory of solids to provide a molecular level which derives new rules relating metabolic rate and body size.

Davies P, Lloyd A, Demetrius LA, Tuszynski, JA (2012) Implications of quantum metabolism and natural selection for the origin of cancer cells and tumor progression. Citation: AIP Advances 2, 011101 (2012); doi: 10.1063/1.3697850

Einstein A (1920), Schallausbreitung in teilweise dissozieirten Gasen

Einstein A (1924) Quantentheorie des einatomigen, idealen Gases

Quantum entanglement between the electron clouds of nucleic acids in DNA

23. Feb. 2015

Rieper, Anders and Vedral modelled the electron clouds of nucleic acids in a single strand of DNA as a chain of coupled quantum harmonic oscillators with dipole-dipole interaction between nearest neighbours. As a main result, the entanglement contained in the chain coincides with the binding energy of the molecule. Derived in the limit of long distances and periodic potentials analytic expressions linking the entanglement witnesses to the energy reduction due to the quantum entanglement in the electron clouds.

Rieper E, Anders J, Vedral V (2011) Quantum entanglement between the electron clouds of nucleic acids in DNA. arxiv.org/abs/1006.4053

 

Wholeness and implicate order: “Deep” quantum chemistry and cell consciousness: quantum chemistry controls genes and biochemistry to give cells and higher organism’s consciousness and complex behavior

23. Feb. 2015

Bohm used the term ‘holomovement’ which is an unbroken and undivided totality and carries an implicate order which is he totality of an order including both the manifested and non-manifested aspects of the order. Non-local quantum phenomena reside in a subtler level than quantum level that is the quantum potential which sustains intimately within the underlying implicates order and the quantum processes are driven by information from quantum potential. A global quantum field of a cell, which can be described as a super orbital, provides many levels of interactions among all particles of a cell. From quantum metabolism pint of view all electrons that are contained in one system are inseparable from eachother. In a cell the cytoplasm is a gel made of up to 30% proteins, and the structure of this gel is very much like a liquid crystal which provides collective properties of the electrons.

All these electrons within this super orbital of molecules and co-enzymes of the cell, including all the many small molecules embedded in these large biomolecules, and cofactors transporting electrons are making up one huge structure that is a global cell orbital.

Bohm D (1980) Wholeness and implicate order. Routledge Classics Eds., London and New York 191-247.

Ventegodt S, Hermansen TD, Flensborg-Madsen T, Nielsen ML and Merrick J (2006) A theory of “Deep” quantum chemistry and cell consciousness: quantum chemistry controls genes and biochemistry to give cells and higher organism’s consciousness and complex behavior. The Scientific World Journal 6, 1441-1453.

Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life

23. Feb. 2015

Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling is being of vital importance for life: physical and chemical processes can be traced directly back to the effects of quantum tunnelling. These processes include the   prebiotic chemistry as well as the function of biomolecular nanomachines and has many highly important implications that can be derived from to the field of molecular, prebiotic chemistry and biological evolution, respectively.

Trixler, F (2013) Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life. Curr Org Chem. 2013 Aug; 17(16): 1758–1770. doi: 10.2174%2F13852728113179990083

Quantum Teleportation and Von Neumann Entropy

23. Feb. 2015

From the aspect of the quantum information theories, various quantum entropies are possibly computed at each stage, which ensures the emergence of the entangled states in the intermediate step. If a single qubit quantum teleportation is near the computational basis, the quantum measurement is dominantly responsible for the joint entropy at the final stage. If it is far from the computational basis, this dominant responsibility is moved into the quantum measurement of system. Therefore, the relative entropy can be regarded as a measure for distance between two different quantum states like trace distance or fidelity. Some relative entropies become infinity, which indicates the non-trivial intersection of the support of one quantum state with kernel of the other quantum state.

You Hwan Ju, Eylee Jung1, Mi-Ra Hwang, D. K. Park, Hungsoo Kim, Min-Soo Kim, Jin-Woo Son, Sahng-Kyoon Yoo, S. Tamaryan (2007) Quantum Teleportation and Von Neumann Entropy. arXiv:0707.1227v1

A new theory of the origin of cancer: quantum coherent entanglement, centrioles, mitosis, and differentiation

23. Feb. 2015

Low non-specific, low intensity laser illumination (635, 670 or 830 nm) apparently enhances centriole replication and promotes cell division, what is the opposite of a desired cancer therapy. In the contrary, centrioles are sensitive to coherent light. Then higher intensity laser illumination – still below heating threshold – may selectively target centrioles, impair mitosis and be a beneficial therapy against malignancy. If centrioles utilize quantum photons for entanglement, properties of centrosomes/centrioles approached more specifically could be useful for therapy. Healthy centrioles for a given organism or tissue differentiation should then have specific quantum optical properties detectable through some type of readout technology. An afflicted patient’s normal cells could be examined to determine the required centriole properties which may then be used to generate identical quantum coherent photons administered to the malignancy. In this mode the idea would not be to destroy the tumor – relatively low energy lasers would be used – but to “reprogram” or redifferentiate the centrioles and transform the tumor back to healthy well differentiated tissue.

Hameroff, SR (2004) A new theory of the origin of cancer: quantum coherent entanglement, centrioles, mitosis, and differentiation. BioSystems 77, 119–136

Cancer news

Increasing incidence of rare skin cancer

16. Feb. 2018

While it may not be as common as other skin cancers, Merkel cell carcinoma is highly aggressive and often deadly — and according to new research, it’s also becoming more common. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Labs differ widely in BRCA testing protocols

15. Feb. 2018

A new article showcases the wide differences in BRCA testing protocols at labs around the world. The article surveyed 86 laboratories around the world about their BRCA testing practices and found that all the labs differed widely in their approach. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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New mutation linked to ovarian cancer can be passed down through dad

15. Feb. 2018

A newly identified mutation, passed down through the X-chromosome, is linked to earlier onset of ovarian cancer in women and prostate cancer in father and sons. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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CRISPR-based diagnostic tool advanced, miniature paper test developed

15. Feb. 2018

The team that first unveiled the rapid, inexpensive, highly sensitive CRISPR-based diagnostic tool called SHERLOCK has greatly enhanced the tool’s power to work with a miniature paper test, similar to a pregnancy test, allowing rapid and simple detection in any setting. Additional features greatly expand both the breadth and sensitivity of the diagnostic information, including the ability to detect multiple targets at once and quantify the amount of target in a sample. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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How cancer cells repair themselves following proton beam therapy

15. Feb. 2018

New research identifies the specific cellular process that helps cancer cells damaged as a result of proton beam therapy, repair themselves. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Working in harmony: New insights into how packages of DNA orchestrate development

15. Feb. 2018

New research illuminates aspects of how an early embryo, the product of fertilization of a female egg cell by a male sperm cell, can give rise to all the many cell types of the adult animal. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Induced pluripotent stem cells could serve as cancer vaccine

15. Feb. 2018

Induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells, are a keystone of regenerative medicine. Outside the body, they can be coaxed to become many different types of cells and tissues that can help repair damage due to trauma or disease. Now, a study in mice suggests another use for iPS cells: training the immune system to attack or even prevent tumors. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Can our genes help predict how women respond to ovarian cancer treatment?

15. Feb. 2018

New research has shown that the genes we inherit can have a significant impact on how the body processes chemotherapy drugs, which may lead to different clinical outcomes for ovarian cancer patients. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Accurate model of how aggressive cancer cells move and spread

15. Feb. 2018

Researchers have produced a new and freely available computer program that predicts cancer cell motion and spread with high accuracy. This new system gives researchers a faster way of examining rapidly spreading glioblastoma tumors — an aggressive and devastating form of brain cancer — and a new way of predicting the likely impact different treatments might have. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Cutting off cervical cancer’s fuel supply stymies tumors

14. Feb. 2018

Researchers have shown that cervical tumors that don’t respond to radiation may be vulnerable to therapies that also attack the cancer’s fuel supply. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Use of immunotherapy to treat aggressive colon tumors

14. Feb. 2018

Researchers have developed a mouse model that mimics advanced human colon cancer. This model has allowed them to study the immune system response for the first time. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Organ-on-chip technology enters next stage as experts test hepatitis B virus

14. Feb. 2018

Scientists are testing how pathogens interact with artificial human organs. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Cancer-killing virus acts by alerting immune system

13. Feb. 2018

A new study has shown that a cancer-killing (‚oncolytic‘) virus currently in clinical trials may function as a cancer vaccine — in addition to killing some cancer cells directly, the virus alerts the immune system to the presence of a tumor, triggering a powerful, widespread immune response that kills cancer cells far outside the virus-infected region. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Cabozantinib shows promise as first line treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer

13. Feb. 2018

A kinase inhibitor called cabozantinib could be a viable therapy option for patients with metastatic, radioactive iodine-resistant thyroid cancer. In a recent trial tumors shrunk in 34 out of 35 patients who took the drug, and more than half of those patients saw the tumor size decrease by more than 30 percent. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Screening for ovarian cancer not recommended

13. Feb. 2018

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against screening for ovarian cancer in women without symptoms and who are not known to be at high risk (such as those who have certain hereditary cancer syndromes that increase the risk for ovarian cancer). (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Light-activated cancer drugs without toxic side effects: Fresh insight

13. Feb. 2018

Future cancer drugs that are activated by light and don’t cause the toxic side-effects of current chemotherapy treatments are closer to becoming a reality, thanks to new research. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Obesity associated with longer survival for men with metastatic melanoma

13. Feb. 2018

Obese patients with metastatic melanoma who are treated with targeted or immune therapies live significantly longer than those with a normal body mass index (BMI), investigators report. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Veranstaltungen

3. Bucerius-Medizinrechtstag "Schnittstellenprobleme des Medizinrechts"

13. Feb. 2018

Eröffnung des Instituts für Medizinrecht an der Bucerius Law School (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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Arbeitstagung NeuroIntensivmedizin (ANIM) 2018

01. Feb. 2018

Die ANIM 2018 ist die 35. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für NeuroIntensiv- und Notfallmedizin und der Deutschen Schlaganfall-Gesellschaft und findet vom 8.–10. Februar 2018 in Würzburg statt. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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ADDITIVE FERTIGUNG – fokus: kunststoff

01. Feb. 2018

Schwerpunktthemen: • Innovationen für Material, Verfahren und Prozesse • Best-Practice-Lösungen für Consumer, Automotive und Medical • Konstruktion und Simulation neu gedacht • Betriebsfestigkeit, Sicherheit und Zuverlässigkeit • Qualifizierung, Zertifizierung und Zulassung (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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78. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Geophysikalischen Gesellschaft

01. Feb. 2018

Die Deutsche Geophysikalische Gesellschaft (DGG) veranstaltet jährlich eine große Fachtagung. Im Jahr 2018 erfolgt die Jahrestagung gemeinsam mit der Österreichischen Geophysikalischen Gesellschaft (Austrian Geophysical Society, AGS) in Leoben. Damit wollen die Gesellschaften in besonderem Maße ihr Interesse an internationalem Austausch und Zusammenarbeit zum Ausdruck bringen. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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68. Öffentliche Hochschultagung der Agrar- und Ernährungswissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Uni Kiel

01. Feb. 2018

Landwirtschaftliche Betriebe müssen heutzutage verschiedensten Aufgaben nachkommen. Grundsätzlich versorgen sie die Bevölkerung mit Nahrungsmitteln. Hinzu kommen gesellschaftliche sowie politische Anforderungen, die zum Beispiel die Schonung der Umwelt oder Tierwohl betreffen. Nicht zuletzt muss der Betrieb wirtschaftlich arbeiten. Diesem Spannungsfeld widmet sich die Hochschultagung der Agrar- und Ernährungswissenschaftliche Fakultät der Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel (CAU). (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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7 Jahre frühe Nutzenbewertung nach AMNOG – Verfahren und Ergebnisse

12. Jan. 2018

Am Donnerstag, 25. Januar 2018 referiert die Leiterin des Bonner Instituts für evidenzbasierte Positionierung im Gesundheitswesen, Prof. Dr. Eva Susanne Dietrich, von 18:00 bis 19:30 Uhr über die verschiedenen Perspektiven des Arzneimittelmarktneuordnungsgesetzes. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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Aktuelle Höhepunkte und Perspektiven der astronautischen und robotischen Raumfahrt in Europa

01. Jan. 2018

Öffentlicher Abendvortrag des NAWI e.V. +++ Referent: Astronaut Dr. Thomas Reiter, European Space Agency (ESA), Darmstadt (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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