Variation in cancer risk among tissues can be explained by the number of stem cell divisions

Tomasetti and Vogelstein show that the lifetime risk of cancers of many different types is strongly correlated with the total number of divisions of the normal self-renewing cells maintaining that tissue’s homeostasis. These results suggest that only a third of the variation in cancer risk among t

[ read more ]

Wholeness and implicate order: “Deep” quantum chemistry and cell consciousness: quantum chemistry controls genes and biochemistry to give cells and higher organism’s consciousness and complex behavior

Bohm used the term ‘holomovement’ which is an unbroken and undivided totality and carries an implicate order which is he totality of an order including both the manifested and non-manifested aspects of the order. Non-local quantum phenomena reside in a subtler level than quantum level that is th

[ read more ]

About metabolism of a carcinoma cell

Most cancer cells utilize aerobic glycolysis irrespective of their tissue of origin. The alteration from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis – called the Warburg effect – is an universal phenomen and has now become a diagnostic tool for cancer detection. Warburg O, Posener K, Negelein E.

[ read more ]

Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life

Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling is being of vital imp

[ read more ]

Quantum entanglement between the electron clouds of nucleic acids in DNA

Rieper, Anders and Vedral modelled the electron clouds of nucleic acids in a single strand of DNA as a chain of coupled quantum harmonic oscillators with dipole-dipole interaction between nearest neighbours. As a main result, the entanglement contained in the chain coincides with the binding energy

[ read more ]

Mitochondria and the evolutionary roots of cancer

Cancer is a group of almost 200 diseases that involve variety of changes in cell structure, morphology, and physiology. Cancer phenotype is underlying several alterations in cellular dynamics with three most critical features, which includes self-sufficiency in growth signals and insensitivity to in

[ read more ]

A new theory of the origin of cancer: quantum coherent entanglement, centrioles, mitosis, and differentiation

Low non-specific, low intensity laser illumination (635, 670 or 830 nm) apparently enhances centriole replication and promotes cell division, what is the opposite of a desired cancer therapy. In the contrary, centrioles are sensitive to coherent light. Then higher intensity laser illumination - stil

[ read more ]

Quantum Teleportation and Von Neumann Entropy

From the aspect of the quantum information theories, various quantum entropies are possibly computed at each stage, which ensures the emergence of the entangled states in the intermediate step. If a single qubit quantum teleportation is near the computational basis, the quantum measurement is domina

[ read more ]

Implications of quantum metabolism and natural selection for the origin of cancer cells and tumor progression

Energy transfer in material solids is driven primarily by differences in intensive thermodynamic quantities such as pressure and temperature. The crucial observation  in quantum-theoretical models was the consideration of the heat capacity as associated with the vibrations of atoms in a crystalline

[ read more ]

A Mitochondrial Paradigm of Metabolic and Degenerative Diseases, Aging, and Cancer: A Dawn for Evolutionary Medicine

Progressive increase in mtDNA 3243A>G heteroplasmy causes abrupt transcriptional reprogramming Wallace hypothesized mitochondrial dysfunction as a central role in a wide range of age-related disorders and various forms of cancer. Steadily rising increases in mitochondrial DNA mutations cause abr

[ read more ]

Meldungen aus der Wissenschaft

Bacteria as pacemaker for the intestine

22. Nov. 2017

CAU research team discovers connection between microbiome and tissue contractions that are indispensable for healthy bowel functions

Spontaneous contractions of the digestive tract play an important role in almost all animals, and ensure healthy bowel functions. From simple invertebrates to humans, there are consistently similar patterns of movement, through which rhythmic contractions of the muscles facilitate the transport and mixing of the bowel contents. These contractions, known as peristalsis, are essential for the digestive process. With various diseases of the digestive tract, such as severe inflammatory bowel diseases in humans, there are disruptions to the normal peristalsis. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Smart people have better connected brains

22. Nov. 2017

Study at Goethe University Frankfurt shows: In intelligent persons, some brain regions interact more closely, while others de-couple themselves. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Bakterien als Schrittmacher des Darms

22. Nov. 2017

CAU-Forschungsteam deckt Verbindung zwischen Mikrobiom und für eine gesunde Darmfunktion unverzichtbaren Gewebekontraktionen auf

Spontane Kontraktionen des Verdauungstrakts spielen bei den allermeisten Lebewesen eine wichtige Rolle, um eine gesunde Darmfunktion zu gewährleisten. Von einfachen wirbellosen Tieren bis hin zum Menschen sind es durchweg ähnliche Bewegungsmuster, die durch das rhythmische Zusammenziehen der Muskulatur den Darminhalt transportieren und durchmischen. Diese Kontraktionen des Darms sind für den Verdauungsprozess unverzichtbar und werden in der Wissenschaft als Peristaltik bezeichnet. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Kluge Köpfe haben die besser vernetzten Gehirne

22. Nov. 2017

Studie an der Goethe-Universität zeigt: Bei intelligenteren Menschen arbeiten manche Gehirnregionen besonders eng zusammen, während andere sich abschirmen. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Neue Ausgabe von „Healthy Ageing – Forschung aus erster Hand“ erschienen

22. Nov. 2017

Die fünfte Ausgabe von „Healthy Ageing – Forschung aus erster Hand“ erscheint heute. Das Magazin des Leibniz-Forschungsverbundes (LFV) Healthy Ageing nimmt wieder neueste Forschungsergebnisse aus den 21 Mitgliedsinstituten in den Fokus. Das Magazin erscheint zweimal jährlich. Es richtet sich an Wissenschaftler, die auch außerhalb ihres Fachbereiches auf die Alternsforschung schauen, sowie an Leser mit Interesse an den Themen Altern und Demographischer Wandel. Die Beiträge bilden das breite interdisziplinäre Spektrum des LFV Healthy ab, von der biomedizinischen Alternsforschung, über Neurologie, Bildungsforschung und Raumplanung bis hin zur Wirtschaftswissenschaft. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Ozeanversauerung schädigt Miesmuscheln im Frühstadium

22. Nov. 2017

Kieler Meeresforscher weisen Einfluss in Muschellarven nach

22.11.2017/Kiel. Muscheln schützen sich gegen Umwelteinflüsse und Feinde durch eine harte Kalkschale. Die zunehmende Versauerung macht es den Organismen immer schwerer, ihre Schalen zu bilden. Eine Gruppe von Forschenden der Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel (CAU) und vom GEOMAR Helmholtz-Zentrum für Ozeanforschung Kiel zeigt in einer Studie, die heute in der internationalen Fachzeitschrift Nature Communications veröffentlicht wird, dass Miesmuschellarven sensibel auf Ozeanversauerung reagieren, was reduzierte Kalzifizierungsraten und Schalenauflösung zur Folge hat. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Klimawandel begünstigt Methanfreisetzung aus Gewässern

22. Nov. 2017

Es ist ein Teufelskreis: Infolge des Klimawandels und steigender Temperaturen tritt immer mehr Methan aus Binnengewässern auf der ganzen Welt aus. Die Freisetzung des Treibhausgases Methan wiederum führt zu einem weiteren Temperaturanstieg und einer Beschleunigung des Klimawandels. WissenschaftlerInnen vom Leibniz-Institut für Gewässerökologie und Binnenfischerei (IGB) waren an einer niederländischen Studie beteiligt, die einen deutlichen Zusammenhang zwischen Temperaturanstieg und Methanemissionen aus Gewässern zeigt. Ein Temperaturanstieg von nur einem Grad Celsius steigert die Methanfreisetzung um sechs bis 20 Prozent. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Beiträge

Mitochondria and the evolutionary roots of cancer

23. Feb. 2015

Cancer is a group of almost 200 diseases that involve variety of changes in cell structure, morphology, and physiology. Cancer phenotype is underlying several alterations in cellular dynamics with three most critical features, which includes self-sufficiency in growth signals and insensitivity to inhibitory signals, evasion of programmed cell death and limitless replicative potential with a potential for the invasion of other organs. Cancer disease is widespread among metazoans. Some properties of cancer cells such as uncontrolled cell proliferation, lack of apoptosis, hypoxia, fermentative metabolism and free cell motility, i.e. metastasis, resemble a prokaryotic lifestyle, which leads to the assumption of a reversal like evolution from eucariotic back to proteobacterial state. This phenotype matches the phenotype of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) that resulted from the endosymbiosis between archaebacteria and α-proteobacteria, which later became the mitochondria.

 Davila AF and Zamorano P (2013) Mitochondria and the evolutionary roots of cancer. Phys. Biol. 10 (2013) 026008, doi:10.1088/1478-3975/10/2/026008

About metabolism of a carcinoma cell

23. Feb. 2015

Most cancer cells utilize aerobic glycolysis irrespective of their tissue of origin. The alteration from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis – called the Warburg effect – is an universal phenomen and has now become a diagnostic tool for cancer detection.

Warburg O, Posener K, Negelein E. (1924) Über den Stoffwechsel der Carcinomzelle. Biochem Z. 152, 309–344.

A Mitochondrial Paradigm of Metabolic and Degenerative Diseases, Aging, and Cancer: A Dawn for Evolutionary Medicine

23. Feb. 2015
Progressive increase in mtDNA 3243A>G heteroplasmy causes abrupt transcriptional reprogramming

Wallace hypothesized mitochondrial dysfunction as a central role in a wide range of age-related disorders and various forms of cancer. Steadily rising increases in mitochondrial DNA mutations cause abrupt shifts in diseases. Discrete changes in nuclear gene expression in response to small increases in DNA mutant level are analogous to the phase shifts that is well known in physics: As heat is added, the ice abruptly turns to water or with more heat abruptly to steam. Therefore, a quantitative change that is an increasing proportion of mitochondrial DNA mutation results in a qualitative change  which coordinate changes in nuclear gene expression together with discrete changes in clinical symptoms.

 Wallace DC (2005) A Mitochondrial Paradigm of Metabolic and Degenerative Diseases, Aging, and Cancer: A Dawn for Evolutionary Medicine. Annu Rev Genet. 2005 ; 39: 359. doi:10.1146/annurev.genet.39.110304.095751

Picard M et. Al (2014) Progressive increase in mtDNA 3243A>G heteroplasmy causes abrupt transcriptional reprogramming. PNAS E4033–E4042, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1414028111

Variation in cancer risk among tissues can be explained by the number of stem cell divisions

23. Feb. 2015

Tomasetti and Vogelstein show that the lifetime risk of cancers of many different types is strongly correlated with the total number of divisions of the normal self-renewing cells maintaining that tissue’s homeostasis. These results suggest that only a third of the variation in cancer risk among tissues is attributable to environmental factors or inherited predispositions. The majority is due to bad luck, that is, random mutations arising during DNA replication in normal, noncancerous stem cells.

Tomasetti C, Vogelstein B (2015): Variation in cancer risk among tissues can be explained by the number of stem cell divisions. Science 2 January 2015: Vol. 347 no. 6217 pp. 78-81 DOI: 10.1126/science.1260825

Implications of quantum metabolism and natural selection for the origin of cancer cells and tumor progression

23. Feb. 2015

Energy transfer in material solids is driven primarily by differences in intensive thermodynamic quantities such as pressure and temperature. The crucial observation  in quantum-theoretical models was the consideration of the heat capacity as associated with the vibrations of atoms in a crystalline solid. However, living organisms are essentially isothermal. Because of very little differences in temperature between different parts of a cell it is assumed that energy flow in living organisms is mediated by differences in the turnover time of various metabolic processes in the cell, which occur in cyclical fashion. It has been shown that the cycle time of these metabolic processes is related to the metabolic rate, that is the rate at which the organism transforms the free energy of whatever source into metabolic work, maintenance of constant temperature and structuraland functional organization of the cells. Quantum Metabolism exploits the methodology of the quantum theory of solids to provide a molecular level which derives new rules relating metabolic rate and body size.

Davies P, Lloyd A, Demetrius LA, Tuszynski, JA (2012) Implications of quantum metabolism and natural selection for the origin of cancer cells and tumor progression. Citation: AIP Advances 2, 011101 (2012); doi: 10.1063/1.3697850

Einstein A (1920), Schallausbreitung in teilweise dissozieirten Gasen

Einstein A (1924) Quantentheorie des einatomigen, idealen Gases

Quantum entanglement between the electron clouds of nucleic acids in DNA

23. Feb. 2015

Rieper, Anders and Vedral modelled the electron clouds of nucleic acids in a single strand of DNA as a chain of coupled quantum harmonic oscillators with dipole-dipole interaction between nearest neighbours. As a main result, the entanglement contained in the chain coincides with the binding energy of the molecule. Derived in the limit of long distances and periodic potentials analytic expressions linking the entanglement witnesses to the energy reduction due to the quantum entanglement in the electron clouds.

Rieper E, Anders J, Vedral V (2011) Quantum entanglement between the electron clouds of nucleic acids in DNA. arxiv.org/abs/1006.4053

 

Wholeness and implicate order: “Deep” quantum chemistry and cell consciousness: quantum chemistry controls genes and biochemistry to give cells and higher organism’s consciousness and complex behavior

23. Feb. 2015

Bohm used the term ‘holomovement’ which is an unbroken and undivided totality and carries an implicate order which is he totality of an order including both the manifested and non-manifested aspects of the order. Non-local quantum phenomena reside in a subtler level than quantum level that is the quantum potential which sustains intimately within the underlying implicates order and the quantum processes are driven by information from quantum potential. A global quantum field of a cell, which can be described as a super orbital, provides many levels of interactions among all particles of a cell. From quantum metabolism pint of view all electrons that are contained in one system are inseparable from eachother. In a cell the cytoplasm is a gel made of up to 30% proteins, and the structure of this gel is very much like a liquid crystal which provides collective properties of the electrons.

All these electrons within this super orbital of molecules and co-enzymes of the cell, including all the many small molecules embedded in these large biomolecules, and cofactors transporting electrons are making up one huge structure that is a global cell orbital.

Bohm D (1980) Wholeness and implicate order. Routledge Classics Eds., London and New York 191-247.

Ventegodt S, Hermansen TD, Flensborg-Madsen T, Nielsen ML and Merrick J (2006) A theory of “Deep” quantum chemistry and cell consciousness: quantum chemistry controls genes and biochemistry to give cells and higher organism’s consciousness and complex behavior. The Scientific World Journal 6, 1441-1453.

Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life

23. Feb. 2015

Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling is being of vital importance for life: physical and chemical processes can be traced directly back to the effects of quantum tunnelling. These processes include the   prebiotic chemistry as well as the function of biomolecular nanomachines and has many highly important implications that can be derived from to the field of molecular, prebiotic chemistry and biological evolution, respectively.

Trixler, F (2013) Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life. Curr Org Chem. 2013 Aug; 17(16): 1758–1770. doi: 10.2174%2F13852728113179990083

Quantum Teleportation and Von Neumann Entropy

23. Feb. 2015

From the aspect of the quantum information theories, various quantum entropies are possibly computed at each stage, which ensures the emergence of the entangled states in the intermediate step. If a single qubit quantum teleportation is near the computational basis, the quantum measurement is dominantly responsible for the joint entropy at the final stage. If it is far from the computational basis, this dominant responsibility is moved into the quantum measurement of system. Therefore, the relative entropy can be regarded as a measure for distance between two different quantum states like trace distance or fidelity. Some relative entropies become infinity, which indicates the non-trivial intersection of the support of one quantum state with kernel of the other quantum state.

You Hwan Ju, Eylee Jung1, Mi-Ra Hwang, D. K. Park, Hungsoo Kim, Min-Soo Kim, Jin-Woo Son, Sahng-Kyoon Yoo, S. Tamaryan (2007) Quantum Teleportation and Von Neumann Entropy. arXiv:0707.1227v1

A new theory of the origin of cancer: quantum coherent entanglement, centrioles, mitosis, and differentiation

23. Feb. 2015

Low non-specific, low intensity laser illumination (635, 670 or 830 nm) apparently enhances centriole replication and promotes cell division, what is the opposite of a desired cancer therapy. In the contrary, centrioles are sensitive to coherent light. Then higher intensity laser illumination – still below heating threshold – may selectively target centrioles, impair mitosis and be a beneficial therapy against malignancy. If centrioles utilize quantum photons for entanglement, properties of centrosomes/centrioles approached more specifically could be useful for therapy. Healthy centrioles for a given organism or tissue differentiation should then have specific quantum optical properties detectable through some type of readout technology. An afflicted patient’s normal cells could be examined to determine the required centriole properties which may then be used to generate identical quantum coherent photons administered to the malignancy. In this mode the idea would not be to destroy the tumor – relatively low energy lasers would be used – but to “reprogram” or redifferentiate the centrioles and transform the tumor back to healthy well differentiated tissue.

Hameroff, SR (2004) A new theory of the origin of cancer: quantum coherent entanglement, centrioles, mitosis, and differentiation. BioSystems 77, 119–136

Cancer news

New cell therapy for relapsed leukemia patients, suggested by clinical trial

20. Nov. 2017

A significant proportion of children and young adults with treatment-resistant B-cell leukemia who participated in a small study achieved remission with the help of a new form of gene therapy, according to researchers. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Improved method of engineering T-cells to attack cancer

20. Nov. 2017

Researchers have found a way to boost the cancer-destroying ability of the immune system’s T-cells, offering new hope in the fight against a wide range of cancers. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Osimertinib improves progression-free survival in Asian EGFR-mutated lung cancer patients

20. Nov. 2017

Osimertinib improves progression-free survival compared to standard first line therapy in Asian patients with EGFR-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to the Asian subset analysis of the FLAURA trial. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Many cancer survivors are living with PTSD

20. Nov. 2017

A recent study showed approximately one-fifth of patients with cancer experienced post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) several months after diagnosis, and many of these patients continued to live with PTSD years later. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Cell-weighing method could help doctors choose cancer drugs

20. Nov. 2017

Researchers can use a new type of measurement to predict how drugs will affect cancer cells taken from multiple myeloma patients. Their predictions correlated with how those patients actually fared when treated with those drugs. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Some cancer therapies may provide a new way to treat high blood pressure

20. Nov. 2017

Drugs designed to halt cancer growth may offer a new way to control high blood pressure (hypertension), say investigators. The finding could offer a real advance in hypertension treatment because although a number of high blood pressure drugs are now available, they work by different mechanisms that are not suited for all patients. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Overweight women may need more frequent mammograms

20. Nov. 2017

Women with higher body mass index (BMI) face an increased risk of not detecting their breast tumor until it has become large, according to a new study. Researchers said the findings suggest that women with higher BMI may need shorter intervals between mammography screening exams. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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How a poorly explored immune cell may impact cancer immunity and immunotherapy

17. Nov. 2017

The immune cells that are trained to fight off the body’s invaders can become defective. It’s what allows cancer to develop. So most research has targeted these co-called effector T-cells. But a new study takes a step back and considers: What if the problem isn’t with the effector T-cells but starts higher up the cellular chain? (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Protein key to cancer cells ability to spread identified

17. Nov. 2017

Scientists have made a discovery that could reduce the spread of cancer by hindering a protein that binds cancer cells together and allows them to invade tissues. The groundbreaking study identified a protein, known as cadherin-22, as a potential factor in cancer metastasis, or spread, and showed that hindering it decreased the adhesion and invasion rate of breast and brain cancer cells by up to 90 percent. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Link between obesity and cancer is not widely recognized

17. Nov. 2017

A new study has shown that the majority of people in the United Kingdom do not understand the connection between weight issues and cancer. Obesity is associated with thirteen types of cancer, including those of the breast, kidney, bowel, and womb. However, after surveying 3293 adults, taken as representative of the UK population, researchers found that only a quarter of respondents were aware of the link between obesity and cancer. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Novel therapeutic target discovered for estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer

17. Nov. 2017

A new protein has been identified in a common subtype of breast cancer which can potentially offer more effective therapies for the future. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Computer program finds new uses for old drugs

16. Nov. 2017

Researchers have developed a computer program to find new indications for old drugs. The computer program, called DrugPredict, matches existing data about FDA-approved drugs to diseases, and predicts potential drug efficacy. In a recent study, the researchers successfully translated DrugPredict results into the laboratory, and showed common pain medications — like aspirin — can kill patient-derived epithelial ovarian cancer cells. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Ancient enzyme could boost power of liquid biopsies to detect and profile cancers

16. Nov. 2017

Researchers are developing a new tool for liquid biopsy that can detect RNA biomarkers from cancer cells in a patient’s blood much more accurately and completely than other existing methods. This could soon provide doctors with a more complete picture of an individual’s disease, improving their chances of finding the best treatment, while also sparing patients the pain, inconvenience and long wait times associated with surgical biopsies. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Wider sampling of tumor tissues may guide drug choice, improve outcomes

15. Nov. 2017

By focusing on genetic variations within a primary tumor, differences between the primary and a metastatic tumor, and additional diversity from tumor DNA in the blood stream, physicians can make better treatment choices for patients with gastric and esophageal adenocarcinoma. This study challenges current guidelines and supports evaluation of metastatic lesions and circulating tumor DNA. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Key to unlock blocked differentiation in microRNA-deficient embryonic stem cells

15. Nov. 2017

Scientists have partly solved a long-unanswered basic question about stem cells — why are pluripotent stem cells that have mutations to block the production of microRNAs unable to differentiate? (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Development of new protein may lead to novel treatment options for cancer, birth defects

14. Nov. 2017

An artificial protein has been engineered that may block malignant properties of cancer cells as well as correct certain birth defects. The findings may lead to identifying new molecular targets suitable for therapeutic intervention. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Why testicular cancer is so responsive to chemo

14. Nov. 2017

A major step has been taken toward answering a key question in cancer research: Why is testicular cancer so responsive to chemotherapy, even after it metastasizes? (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Veranstaltungen

12. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Wirbelsäulengesellschaft (DWG)

20. Nov. 2017

Der diesjährige Schwerpunkt des Kongresses liegt auf den Themen Trauma und Tumor in der Wirbelsäulenchirurgie. Wichtige wissenschaftliche Beiträge zu Tumorerkrankungen, degenerativen Erkrankungen, entzündlichen und metabolischen Erkrankungen, Verletzungen und Deformitäten aber auch zu innovativen Techniken erwarten die Besucherinnen und Besucher. Dabei steht ein fächerübergreifender Ansatz im Vordergrund, denn auch auf dem Gebiet der Wirbelsäulenheilkunde gilt es, Bewährtes zu erhalten und gleichzeitig neuen Behandlungsmethoden gegenüber offen zu sein. Dass die Deutsche Wirbelsäulengesellschaft diesen Anspruch ernst nimmt, zeigt auch die Zentren-Zertifizierung, die in diesem Jahr gestartet wurde. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

- Weiterlesen

Biologisierung der Medizintechnik – Workshop VII – Biomaterial – Immunsystem Wechselwirkungen

01. Nov. 2017

Wechselwirkungen zwischen Biomaterialien und dem Organismus können zu Problemen führen oder Chancen eröffnen. Die Einflüsse reichen vom Biofouling während des Erstkontaktes bis hin zu Implantatverlusten. Eine zentrale Rolle spielt das Immunsystem, das viele dieser Reaktionen koordiniert. Ziel ist es deshalb, ein rationales Design von Biomaterialien mit immunmodulierenden Eigenschaften zu erreichen. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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Akademievorlesung "Willkommen in Utopia." | 16.11.2017 18:00 Uhr – 20:00 Uhr

01. Nov. 2017

Mit der Akademievorlesung zieht die Interdisziplinare Arbeitsgruppe „Gentechnologiebericht“ 16 Jahre nach ihrer Gründung Bilanz anlässlich eines heute wie damals höchst umstrittenen und viel diskutierten Forschungsbereichs. In Expertenbeiträgen und Podiumsdiskussionen werden die Gentechnologien dabei sowohl in ihrer historischen und zukünftigen Entwicklung als auch in ihrer aktuellen gesellschafts- und forschungspolitischen Relevanz eingeordnet. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

- Weiterlesen

Akademievorlesung "Wie werden Gentechnologien kontrolliert?" | 09.11.2017 18:00 Uhr – 21:00 Uhr

01. Nov. 2017

Mit der Akademievorlesung zieht die Interdisziplinare Arbeitsgruppe „Gentechnologiebericht“ 16 Jahre nach ihrer Gründung Bilanz anlässlich eines heute wie damals höchst umstrittenen und viel diskutierten Forschungsbereichs. In Expertenbeiträgen und Podiumsdiskussionen werden die Gentechnologien dabei sowohl in ihrer historischen und zukünftigen Entwicklung als auch in ihrer aktuellen gesellschafts- und forschungspolitischen Relevanz eingeordnet. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

- Weiterlesen

Akademievorlesung "Gentechnologien damals, heute und morgen" | 02.11.2017 18:00 Uhr – 21:00 Uhr

01. Nov. 2017

Mit der Akademievorlesung zieht die Interdisziplinare Arbeitsgruppe „Gentechnologiebericht“ 16 Jahre nach ihrer Gründung Bilanz anlässlich eines heute wie damals höchst umstrittenen und viel diskutierten Forschungsbereichs. In Expertenbeiträgen und Podiumsdiskussionen werden die Gentechnologien dabei sowohl in ihrer historischen und zukünftigen Entwicklung als auch in ihrer aktuellen gesellschafts- und forschungspolitischen Relevanz eingeordnet. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

- Weiterlesen

Air Pollution and Health: New Research Perspectives for a Growing Global Crisis

01. Nov. 2017

Joint symposium by the Academy of Science of South Africa and the Leopoldina (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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6. Morbi-RSA Symposium

01. Nov. 2017

Eigentlich soll der morbiditätsorientierte Risikostrukturausgleich – kurz: Morbi-RSA – den Finanzausgleich zwischen den gesetzlichen Krankenversicherungen regeln. Fakt ist: Die Kassen haben nach wie vor die Möglichkeit, ärztliche Diagnosen zu beeinflussen, um so höhere Zuwendungen aus dem Gesundheitsfonds zu erreichen. Das geht aus einem Gutachten des Berliner IGES Instituts hervor – und liefert jede Menge Zündstoff für das 6. Morbi-RSA Symposium am 20. November 2017 in Essen. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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