Mitochondria and the evolutionary roots of cancer

Cancer is a group of almost 200 diseases that involve variety of changes in cell structure, morphology, and physiology. Cancer phenotype is underlying several alterations in cellular dynamics with three most critical features, which includes self-sufficiency in growth signals and insensitivity to in

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A Mitochondrial Paradigm of Metabolic and Degenerative Diseases, Aging, and Cancer: A Dawn for Evolutionary Medicine

Progressive increase in mtDNA 3243A>G heteroplasmy causes abrupt transcriptional reprogramming Wallace hypothesized mitochondrial dysfunction as a central role in a wide range of age-related disorders and various forms of cancer. Steadily rising increases in mitochondrial DNA mutations cause abr

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Wholeness and implicate order: “Deep” quantum chemistry and cell consciousness: quantum chemistry controls genes and biochemistry to give cells and higher organism’s consciousness and complex behavior

Bohm used the term ‘holomovement’ which is an unbroken and undivided totality and carries an implicate order which is he totality of an order including both the manifested and non-manifested aspects of the order. Non-local quantum phenomena reside in a subtler level than quantum level that is th

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Quantum Teleportation and Von Neumann Entropy

From the aspect of the quantum information theories, various quantum entropies are possibly computed at each stage, which ensures the emergence of the entangled states in the intermediate step. If a single qubit quantum teleportation is near the computational basis, the quantum measurement is domina

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Variation in cancer risk among tissues can be explained by the number of stem cell divisions

Tomasetti and Vogelstein show that the lifetime risk of cancers of many different types is strongly correlated with the total number of divisions of the normal self-renewing cells maintaining that tissue’s homeostasis. These results suggest that only a third of the variation in cancer risk among t

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Implications of quantum metabolism and natural selection for the origin of cancer cells and tumor progression

Energy transfer in material solids is driven primarily by differences in intensive thermodynamic quantities such as pressure and temperature. The crucial observation  in quantum-theoretical models was the consideration of the heat capacity as associated with the vibrations of atoms in a crystalline

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Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life

Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling is being of vital imp

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About metabolism of a carcinoma cell

Most cancer cells utilize aerobic glycolysis irrespective of their tissue of origin. The alteration from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis – called the Warburg effect – is an universal phenomen and has now become a diagnostic tool for cancer detection. Warburg O, Posener K, Negelein E.

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Quantum entanglement between the electron clouds of nucleic acids in DNA

Rieper, Anders and Vedral modelled the electron clouds of nucleic acids in a single strand of DNA as a chain of coupled quantum harmonic oscillators with dipole-dipole interaction between nearest neighbours. As a main result, the entanglement contained in the chain coincides with the binding energy

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A new theory of the origin of cancer: quantum coherent entanglement, centrioles, mitosis, and differentiation

Low non-specific, low intensity laser illumination (635, 670 or 830 nm) apparently enhances centriole replication and promotes cell division, what is the opposite of a desired cancer therapy. In the contrary, centrioles are sensitive to coherent light. Then higher intensity laser illumination - stil

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The future of fighting cancer: Zapping tumors in less than a second

New accelerator-based technology aims to reduce the side effects of cancer radiation therapy by shrinking its duration from minutes to under a second. Built into future compact medical devices, technology developed for high-energy physics could also help make radiation therapy more accessible around the world. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

Promising lead in genetic approach to treating glioblastoma

Scientists hope they have made progress toward a next-generation drug that may slow tumor growth and boost radiation’s effectiveness in patients with the deadly brain cancer. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

Tiny molecule has big effect in childhood brain tumor studies

A very small molecule under study is able to kill a childhood brain cancer, and the lead researcher said it may be possible to reduce by 90 percent the amount of chemotherapy and radiation required to kill such tumors. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

High exposure to radio frequency radiation associated with cancer in male rats

The National Toxicology Program (NTP) concluded there is clear evidence that male rats exposed to high levels of radio frequency radiation (RFR) like that used in 2G and 3G cell phones developed cancerous heart tumors, according to final reports released today. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

Mouse and human skin cells produce melanin on a 48-hour cycle

Researchers have discovered that mouse skin and skin cells from humans produce pigmentation in response to sunlight on a 48-hour cycle. They observed that exposing skin to ultraviolet light every two days yielded darker pigmentation with less radiation damage than daily exposure. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

A 150-year-old drug might improve radiation therapy for cancer

A drug first identified 150 years ago and used as a smooth-muscle relaxant might make tumors more sensitive to radiation therapy. Researchers found that the drug papaverine inhibits the respiration of mitochondria, the oxygen-consuming and energy-making components of cells, and sensitizes model tumors to radiation. They found that the drug does not affect the radiation sensitivity of well-oxygenated normal tissues. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

Blütenpracht durch genetische Anpassung: Wiener Wissenschafter entschlüsseln Genom der Akelei

Die Akelei ist eine Pflanze mit auffallend schönen Blüten und rund siebzig verschiedenen Arten in der nördlichen Hemisphäre, vier davon findet man in Österreich. Diese große Vielfalt ist das Ergebnis eines Prozesses, welcher adaptive Radiation genannt wird: Die adaptive Radiation lässt, aufgrund der Anpassung an neue Standorte, neue Arten sehr schnell entstehen. Bei der Akelei sind durch diesen Prozess Arten mit sehr unterschiedlichen Blütenfarben und -formen entstanden, die untereinander problemlos gekreuzt werden können. In Gärtnereien und Privatgärten konnte dadurch eine riesige Vielzahl von sehr unterschiedlichen prachtvollen Blütenvariationen gezüchtet werden. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

microRNAs Predict Recurrence Risk of Head and Neck Tumors

A new method predicts the course of HPV-negative head and neck cancer after radiation chemotherapy. According to a recent article in the journal ‘Clinical Cancer Research’, five microRNAs (miRNAs) can provide the decisive data. The work was conducted at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU) in close collaboration with the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK). (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Effect of radiation exposure on hormone deficiencies

Researchers have detailed the effect of radiation exposure on the development of hormone deficiency in pediatric and young adult patients treated for brain tumors. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

New drug could prevent debilitating side effect of cancer treatment

About 50,000 people in the US are diagnosed annually with head, neck, nasal and oral cancers. Most are treated with radiation, and of those, 70-80 percent develop a painful and debilitating side effect called severe oral mucositis. A new drug could potentially prevent the condition. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

Cancer news

Depression, anxiety may take same toll on health as smoking and obesity

17. Dez. 2018

An annual physical typically involves a weight check and questions about unhealthy habits like smoking, but a new study suggests health care providers may be overlooking a critical question: Are you depressed or anxious? (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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New epigenetic cervical cancer test has 100 per cent detection rate

17. Dez. 2018

A new test for cervical cancer was found to detect all of the cancers in a trial of 15,744 women, outperforming both the current Pap smear and human papillomavirus (HPV) test at a reduced cost, according to a new study. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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New strains of hepatitis C found in Africa

17. Dez. 2018

The largest population study of hepatitis C in Africa has found three new strains of the virus circulating in the general population in sub-Saharan Africa. The discovery suggests certain antiviral drugs used in the West may be less effective against these strains, and local clinical trials of patients are urgently needed. The study could inform hepatitis C vaccine development and assist the World Health Organization’s aim of eliminating hepatitis C globally. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Treatment shown to improve the odds against bone marrow cancer

15. Dez. 2018

Hope has emerged for patients with a serious type of bone marrow cancer as new research into a therapeutic drug has revealed improved outcomes and survival rates. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Study shows magnesium optimizes vitamin D status

14. Dez. 2018

A randomized trial indicates that magnesium optimizes vitamin D status, raising it in people with deficient levels and lowering it in people with high levels. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Prostate cancer: New computer model enables researchers to predict course of disease

14. Dez. 2018

How does a normal cell turn into a deadly cancer? Seeking an answer to this Question researchers examined the tumor genomes of nearly 300 prostate cancer patients. Their findings describe the ways in which changes in the prostate cells‘ genetic information pave the way for cancer development. Using a newly developed computer model, it is now possible to predict the course of the disease in individual patients. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Genetic marker, predictor of early relapse in pediatric ALL uncovered

14. Dez. 2018

Researchers recently discovered that by testing the level of NER (nucleotide excision repair) gene expression, pediatric oncologists can determine the likelihood of early relapse (less than three years) in their acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Exercise-induced hormone irisin triggers bone remodeling in mice

13. Dez. 2018

Exercise has been touted to build bone mass, but exactly how it actually accomplishes this is a matter of debate. Now, researchers show that an exercise-induced hormone activates cells that are critical for bone remodeling in mice. A study identifies a receptor for irisin, an exercise hormone, and shows that irisin impacts sclerostin in mice, a major cellular regulator of bone structure in humans. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Drug targets for Ebola, Dengue, and Zika viruses found in lab study

13. Dez. 2018

No drugs are currently available to treat Ebola, Dengue, or Zika viruses, which infect millions of people every year and result in severe illness, birth defects, and even death. Scientists may finally change that. They identified key ways the three viruses hijack the body’s cells, and they found at least one potential drug that can disrupt this process in human cells. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Excess body weight responsible for nearly 4 percent of cancers worldwide

13. Dez. 2018

Excess body weight accounted for approximately 3.9 percent of all cancers worldwide in 2012, a figure that is expected to rise in the coming decades given current trends. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Unlocking the secrets of how cells communicate offers insights into treating diseases

12. Dez. 2018

Researchers have made a significant breakthrough by developing the 3D structure of proteins from inside the eye lens that control how cells communicate with each other, which could open the door to treating diseases such as cataracts, stroke and cancer. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Improved understanding of the pathology of dwarfism may lead to new treatment targets

12. Dez. 2018

Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is a severe inherited dwarfing condition In PSACH, a genetic mutation leads to abnormal retention of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cartilage-producing cells (chondrocytes), which interferes with function and cell viability. Investigators describe how this protein accumulation results in ‚ER stress‘ and initiates a host of pathologic changes. These findings may open up new ways to treat PSACH and other ER-stress-related conditions. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Faster, cheaper test can help predict risk of metastasis in prostate cancer patients

12. Dez. 2018

A report describes a new assay to assess copy number alterations that is cheaper, faster, reproducible, and requires less tissue than other diagnostic techniques and has the potential to significantly enhance prostate cancer evaluation. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Novel technique may significantly reduce breast biopsies

12. Dez. 2018

A novel technique that uses mammography to determine the biological tissue composition of a tumor could help reduce unnecessary breast biopsies, according to a new study. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Disruption of circadian rhythm as risk factor for diseases

11. Dez. 2018

Scientists report a time-keeping mechanism in liver cells that helps sustain key organ tasks can contribute to diseases when its natural rhythm is disrupted. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Shape-shifting cell breakthrough

11. Dez. 2018

A new computational model gives a clearer picture of the structure and mechanics of soft, shape-changing cells that could provide a better understanding of cancerous tumor growth, wound healing, and embryonic development. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

11. Dez. 2018

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers two years ago. In a follow-up study, scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Veranstaltungen

26. Wissenschaftliches Symposium für Psychotherapie: Liebe und Partnerschaft

02. Dez. 2018

„Liebe und Partnerschaft“ hat in der heutigen Zeit, in der fast jede zweite Ehe geschieden wird, eine enorme Bedeutung. Tatsächlich befassen sich schon seit Jahrhunderten Philosophen, Ärzte und Psychologen mit diesem Thema. Auf dem Symposium wird es daher aus unterschiedlichen Perspektiven betrachtet – aus Sicht der Psychotherapie, der Sexualmedizin, der Soziologie und der Literaturwissenschaften. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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18. Kongress der DIVI

02. Dez. 2018

Der 18. Kongress der Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin (DIVI) findet vom 05.12.2018 – 07.12.2018 in Leipzig statt. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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38. Marktplatz Gesundheit: „Klinische Bewertung nach der neuen MDR – die Zeit läuft“

01. Nov. 2018

Medizintechnik ist Technik für Menschen. Wer sie entwickelt, herstellt und vertreibt, unterliegt daher besonderen Vorschriften. Maßgeblich dafür ist die EU-Verordnung zu Medizinprodukten (Medical Device Regulation = MDR), welche durch die europäische Zulassung ab 2020 einheitlich geregelt wird. Dies bringt viele Änderungen mit sich. Jeder Hersteller von Medizinprodukten muss sich mit den neuen Anforderungen auseinandersetzen. Es gibt also viel zu bereden! (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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21. Deutsche Mukoviszidose Tagung (DMT)

01. Nov. 2018

Jedes Jahr im November veranstaltet der Mukoviszidose e.V. die Deutsche Mukoviszidose Tagung. An drei Tagen (22.-24.11.2018) wird ein breites Fort- und Weiterbildungsangebot für das interdisziplinäre Mukoviszidose-Behandler-Team präsentiert. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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21. Deutsche Mukoviszidose Tagung

01. Nov. 2018

Die Deutsche Mukoviszidose Tagung – mit jährlich rund 800 Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmern die größte Fortbildungsveranstaltung zur Mukoviszidose in Deutschland – richtet sich an das gesamte Behandler-Team und verbindet interdisziplinäre Fragestellungen. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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1. Community Health Konferenz in Bochum

01. Nov. 2018

Das Department of Community Health (DoCH) der Hochschule für Gesundheit (hsg Bochum) veranstaltet die erste Community Health Konferenz an der hsg Bochum. Die Konferenz ist als Auftakt für eine jährliche Veranstaltung geplant, welche Wissenschaft, Praxis und Lehre anspricht und zusammenführt. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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100 Jahre Influenza – Wie gut sind wir für die nächste Pandemie vorbereitet?

01. Nov. 2018

Weshalb traf die Spanische Grippe, ausgelöst von einem H1N1 Influenzavirus, die Welt derart unvorbereitet? Wie gut wären wir gegen eine kommende Pandemie aufgestellt? Diesen Fragen der modernen Medizin geht Prof. Dr. Gülsah Gabriel in ihrem Vortrag zu 100 Jahren Influenza nach. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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