Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life

Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling is being of vital imp

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Implications of quantum metabolism and natural selection for the origin of cancer cells and tumor progression

Energy transfer in material solids is driven primarily by differences in intensive thermodynamic quantities such as pressure and temperature. The crucial observation  in quantum-theoretical models was the consideration of the heat capacity as associated with the vibrations of atoms in a crystalline

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Variation in cancer risk among tissues can be explained by the number of stem cell divisions

Tomasetti and Vogelstein show that the lifetime risk of cancers of many different types is strongly correlated with the total number of divisions of the normal self-renewing cells maintaining that tissue’s homeostasis. These results suggest that only a third of the variation in cancer risk among t

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Mitochondria and the evolutionary roots of cancer

Cancer is a group of almost 200 diseases that involve variety of changes in cell structure, morphology, and physiology. Cancer phenotype is underlying several alterations in cellular dynamics with three most critical features, which includes self-sufficiency in growth signals and insensitivity to in

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A new theory of the origin of cancer: quantum coherent entanglement, centrioles, mitosis, and differentiation

Low non-specific, low intensity laser illumination (635, 670 or 830 nm) apparently enhances centriole replication and promotes cell division, what is the opposite of a desired cancer therapy. In the contrary, centrioles are sensitive to coherent light. Then higher intensity laser illumination - stil

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A Mitochondrial Paradigm of Metabolic and Degenerative Diseases, Aging, and Cancer: A Dawn for Evolutionary Medicine

Progressive increase in mtDNA 3243A>G heteroplasmy causes abrupt transcriptional reprogramming Wallace hypothesized mitochondrial dysfunction as a central role in a wide range of age-related disorders and various forms of cancer. Steadily rising increases in mitochondrial DNA mutations cause abr

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About metabolism of a carcinoma cell

Most cancer cells utilize aerobic glycolysis irrespective of their tissue of origin. The alteration from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis – called the Warburg effect – is an universal phenomen and has now become a diagnostic tool for cancer detection. Warburg O, Posener K, Negelein E.

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Wholeness and implicate order: “Deep” quantum chemistry and cell consciousness: quantum chemistry controls genes and biochemistry to give cells and higher organism’s consciousness and complex behavior

Bohm used the term ‘holomovement’ which is an unbroken and undivided totality and carries an implicate order which is he totality of an order including both the manifested and non-manifested aspects of the order. Non-local quantum phenomena reside in a subtler level than quantum level that is th

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Quantum entanglement between the electron clouds of nucleic acids in DNA

Rieper, Anders and Vedral modelled the electron clouds of nucleic acids in a single strand of DNA as a chain of coupled quantum harmonic oscillators with dipole-dipole interaction between nearest neighbours. As a main result, the entanglement contained in the chain coincides with the binding energy

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Quantum Teleportation and Von Neumann Entropy

From the aspect of the quantum information theories, various quantum entropies are possibly computed at each stage, which ensures the emergence of the entangled states in the intermediate step. If a single qubit quantum teleportation is near the computational basis, the quantum measurement is domina

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Bacterial control mechanism for adjusting to changing conditions: How do bacteria adapt?

A fundamental prerequisite for life on earth is the ability of living organisms to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the University of California San Diego (UCSD) have now determined that the regulation mechanisms used by bacteria to adapt to different environments are based on a global control process that can be described in a single equation. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

“Plant cinema” shows the flow of energy

Nothing works without fuel: plants also depend on fuel for growth and development. In living organisms, fuel comes as the universal energy currency adenosine triphosphate (ATP). An international team of researchers led by the University of Bonn shows how ATP behaves in the different parts of living seedlings and the impact of stress on their fuel status. The results could inform breeding of more resistant crop varieties. This “plant cinema in real time” is now presented by the journal eLIFE. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Developmental Leaps on the Way to Becoming a Plant

German-Israeli research team under the leadership of Kiel University discovers evolutionary origin of redox regulation in plants

During the development of higher life forms over the course of millions of years, there have always been significant and comparatively sudden leaps in development. As a consequence, living organisms developed new skills and conquered additional habitats. In this process they adopted these abilities partly from their predecessor organisms: For example the plastids of the plants, the place where photosynthesis takes place, were originally autonomous unicellular living organisms. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

When Air is in Short Supply – Shedding light on plant stress reactions when oxygen runs short

Like all living organisms, plants need oxygen to survive. The threat of being cut off from the air supply (hypoxia) looms large for plants in times of flood. Plants react to the threat by activating a specific survival program. For quite some time, scientists are familiar with the molecular mechanism of this stress program for animals and bacteria. However, the elucidation of plant reactions to hypoxia confounded scientists. At the Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry (IPB) in Halle and at the University of Oxford, experimental research provided the answers that closed the gaps in the existing hypotheses. In a paper […]

Phenotype at the push of a button

Scientists at the Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry (IPB) in Halle have developed a method that makes it possible to accumulate or break down chosen proteins in living organisms as needed. In order to accomplish this, researchers around Dr. Nico Dissmeyer together with scientists from Cologne and Zurich have developed a molecular switch that can be activated by temperature changes. This switch enables plants to produce the desired protein in large quantities at low ambient temperatures. On the other hand, the protein is completely broken down within a few hours after a moderate temperature increase. Now the method has been […]

New nanotechnology detects biomarkers of cancer

Researchers have developed a new technology to detect disease biomarkers in the form of nucleic acids, the building blocks of all living organisms. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

New nanotechnology detects biomarkers of cancer

Researchers have developed a new technology to detect disease biomarkers in the form of nucleic acids, the building blocks of all living organisms. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

A new role for vitamin B6 in plants

Vitamin B6, which exists in different natural forms called vitamers, is essential for all living organisms, as it participates in numerous aspects of cells’ everyday life. Researchers from the University of Geneva, Switzerland, and collaborators have discovered an unexpected role for this micronutrient, in relation to nitrogen metabolism. Described in the journal The Plant Cell, the results indicate that one of the vitamers informs the plant of its content in ammonium, a basic nitrogen compound needed e.g. for the biosynthesis of proteins. In the future, vitamin B6 could be used to ascertain the nitrogen status of plants and eventually prevent […]

Learning from Nature: Genomic database standard alleviates search for novel antibiotics

Penicillin, an antibiotic discovered by Alexander Fleming in 1928, is well known. While Fleming noticed the effect of this compound by pure chance, nowadays the quest for novel agents relies on systematic research. Meanwhile scientists identified many more secondary metabolites like Erythromycin, an antibacterial drug. The enormous relevance of these natural products in medicine, agriculture and biotechnology is without any doubt.Many living organisms like plants, fungi and bacteria produce these small exotic molecules in several steps of synthesis, and researchers use computer-based methods for novel compounds and consider their potential use. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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New details of the transmission of stimuli in living organisms unveiled

Researchers unveil new details of how cells in a living organism process stimuli. So-called G-proteins, which help conduct external stimuli that reach a cell into its interior, play a central role here. For the first time, the study shows which parts of the G-proteins are vital for their function. Researchers from the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, ETH Zurich, the pharmaceutical company Roche and the British MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology report their results in the journals Nature and Nature Structural and Molecular Biology. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Cancer news

Novel technique may significantly reduce breast biopsies

12. Dez. 2018

A novel technique that uses mammography to determine the biological tissue composition of a tumor could help reduce unnecessary breast biopsies, according to a new study. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Disruption of circadian rhythm as risk factor for diseases

11. Dez. 2018

Scientists report a time-keeping mechanism in liver cells that helps sustain key organ tasks can contribute to diseases when its natural rhythm is disrupted. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Shape-shifting cell breakthrough

11. Dez. 2018

A new computational model gives a clearer picture of the structure and mechanics of soft, shape-changing cells that could provide a better understanding of cancerous tumor growth, wound healing, and embryonic development. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

11. Dez. 2018

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers two years ago. In a follow-up study, scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Taking uncertainty out of cancer prognosis

11. Dez. 2018

An analysis of nearly 20,000 cancer patient histories and genetic data has revealed that knowing the genetic cause of a cancer does not help predict how deadly the disease will be. Instead, researchers have discovered that copy number variations in specific gene sites are far more informative, providing new opportunities to improve prognosis. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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New light-based technology reveals how cells communicate in human disease

11. Dez. 2018

Scientists have developed a new technique that uses light to understand how cells communicate in human disease. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Pushing closer to a new cancer-fighting strategy

11. Dez. 2018

A molecular pathway that’s frequently mutated in many different forms of cancer becomes active when cells push parts of their membranes outward into bulging protrusions, researchers report. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Increased risk for breast cancer after childbirth may last more than 20 years

10. Dez. 2018

The increased risk for breast cancer that occurs after childbirth can last more than 20 years. The risk may be enhanced when a woman is older at first birth or has a family history of breast cancer, and is not mitigated by breastfeeding. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Sprayable gel could help the body fight off cancer after surgery

10. Dez. 2018

A research team has developed a spray gel embedded with immune-boosting drugs that could help lower the risk of cancer recurrence after surgery. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Some brain tumors may respond to immunotherapy

10. Dez. 2018

A new study suggests that a slow-growing brain tumor arising in patients affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) may be vulnerable to immunotherapy, which gives the immune system a boost in fighting cancer. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Physicist creates tiny sensors to assist in cancer detection

10. Dez. 2018

A physicist hopes to improve cancer detection with a new and novel class of nanomaterials. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Personalized medicine tool for inherited colorectal cancer syndrome

10. Dez. 2018

An international team of researchers has developed, calibrated, and validated a novel tool for identifying the genetic changes in Lynch syndrome genes that are likely to be responsible for causing symptoms of the disease. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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New light on blocking Shiga and ricin toxins — And on an iconic biological process

10. Dez. 2018

Researchers, setting their sights on Shiga toxin (player in the current E. coli outbreak from romaine lettuce) and ricin (a bioterrorism agent), have now identified potential protective strategies. Their study also sheds new light on glycosylation, the attachment of sugars to large molecules, key to cells‘ ability to create more diverse molecules beyond what’s encoded in the genome. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Cancer cells distinguished by artificial intelligence-based system

10. Dez. 2018

A research team has created a system that uses a convolutional neural network to learn the features distinguishing different cancer cells, based on images from a phase-contrast microscope. This system accurately differentiated human and mouse cancer cells, as well as their radioresistant clones. This novel approach can improve the speed and accuracy of cancer diagnosis by avoiding the laboriousness and potential errors associated with equivalent analyses by humans. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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New insights into childhood cancer

10. Dez. 2018

Peripheral nervous system tumors, known as neuroblastoma, are one of the most common types of childhood tumors. Researchers have now studied the genetic factors behind different tumor subtypes and their prognoses. Their findings enable clinicians to predict the precise clinical course of the disease, and to adapt their treatment regimens accordingly. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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How does cancer spread?

10. Dez. 2018

How does cancer spread? While studying human brain tumour cells, a team of scientists found some answers to this crucial, yet so far unanswered question. They looked at a gene called EGFRvIII, which is present in patients with glioblastoma — a highly aggressive form of brain cancer that spreads quickly and that is difficult to treat. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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The naked eye alone is not enough to ensure the accurate diagnosis of skin cancer, say experts

08. Dez. 2018

The visual inspection of a suspicious skin lesion using the naked eye alone is not enough to ensure the accurate diagnosis of skin cancer, a group of experts have concluded. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Veranstaltungen

26. Wissenschaftliches Symposium für Psychotherapie: Liebe und Partnerschaft

02. Dez. 2018

„Liebe und Partnerschaft“ hat in der heutigen Zeit, in der fast jede zweite Ehe geschieden wird, eine enorme Bedeutung. Tatsächlich befassen sich schon seit Jahrhunderten Philosophen, Ärzte und Psychologen mit diesem Thema. Auf dem Symposium wird es daher aus unterschiedlichen Perspektiven betrachtet – aus Sicht der Psychotherapie, der Sexualmedizin, der Soziologie und der Literaturwissenschaften. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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18. Kongress der DIVI

02. Dez. 2018

Der 18. Kongress der Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin (DIVI) findet vom 05.12.2018 – 07.12.2018 in Leipzig statt. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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38. Marktplatz Gesundheit: „Klinische Bewertung nach der neuen MDR – die Zeit läuft“

01. Nov. 2018

Medizintechnik ist Technik für Menschen. Wer sie entwickelt, herstellt und vertreibt, unterliegt daher besonderen Vorschriften. Maßgeblich dafür ist die EU-Verordnung zu Medizinprodukten (Medical Device Regulation = MDR), welche durch die europäische Zulassung ab 2020 einheitlich geregelt wird. Dies bringt viele Änderungen mit sich. Jeder Hersteller von Medizinprodukten muss sich mit den neuen Anforderungen auseinandersetzen. Es gibt also viel zu bereden! (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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21. Deutsche Mukoviszidose Tagung (DMT)

01. Nov. 2018

Jedes Jahr im November veranstaltet der Mukoviszidose e.V. die Deutsche Mukoviszidose Tagung. An drei Tagen (22.-24.11.2018) wird ein breites Fort- und Weiterbildungsangebot für das interdisziplinäre Mukoviszidose-Behandler-Team präsentiert. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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21. Deutsche Mukoviszidose Tagung

01. Nov. 2018

Die Deutsche Mukoviszidose Tagung – mit jährlich rund 800 Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmern die größte Fortbildungsveranstaltung zur Mukoviszidose in Deutschland – richtet sich an das gesamte Behandler-Team und verbindet interdisziplinäre Fragestellungen. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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1. Community Health Konferenz in Bochum

01. Nov. 2018

Das Department of Community Health (DoCH) der Hochschule für Gesundheit (hsg Bochum) veranstaltet die erste Community Health Konferenz an der hsg Bochum. Die Konferenz ist als Auftakt für eine jährliche Veranstaltung geplant, welche Wissenschaft, Praxis und Lehre anspricht und zusammenführt. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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100 Jahre Influenza – Wie gut sind wir für die nächste Pandemie vorbereitet?

01. Nov. 2018

Weshalb traf die Spanische Grippe, ausgelöst von einem H1N1 Influenzavirus, die Welt derart unvorbereitet? Wie gut wären wir gegen eine kommende Pandemie aufgestellt? Diesen Fragen der modernen Medizin geht Prof. Dr. Gülsah Gabriel in ihrem Vortrag zu 100 Jahren Influenza nach. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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