Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life

Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling is being of vital imp

[ read more ]

Mitochondria and the evolutionary roots of cancer

Cancer is a group of almost 200 diseases that involve variety of changes in cell structure, morphology, and physiology. Cancer phenotype is underlying several alterations in cellular dynamics with three most critical features, which includes self-sufficiency in growth signals and insensitivity to in

[ read more ]

A new theory of the origin of cancer: quantum coherent entanglement, centrioles, mitosis, and differentiation

Low non-specific, low intensity laser illumination (635, 670 or 830 nm) apparently enhances centriole replication and promotes cell division, what is the opposite of a desired cancer therapy. In the contrary, centrioles are sensitive to coherent light. Then higher intensity laser illumination - stil

[ read more ]

Wholeness and implicate order: “Deep” quantum chemistry and cell consciousness: quantum chemistry controls genes and biochemistry to give cells and higher organism’s consciousness and complex behavior

Bohm used the term ‘holomovement’ which is an unbroken and undivided totality and carries an implicate order which is he totality of an order including both the manifested and non-manifested aspects of the order. Non-local quantum phenomena reside in a subtler level than quantum level that is th

[ read more ]

Quantum Teleportation and Von Neumann Entropy

From the aspect of the quantum information theories, various quantum entropies are possibly computed at each stage, which ensures the emergence of the entangled states in the intermediate step. If a single qubit quantum teleportation is near the computational basis, the quantum measurement is domina

[ read more ]

Implications of quantum metabolism and natural selection for the origin of cancer cells and tumor progression

Energy transfer in material solids is driven primarily by differences in intensive thermodynamic quantities such as pressure and temperature. The crucial observation  in quantum-theoretical models was the consideration of the heat capacity as associated with the vibrations of atoms in a crystalline

[ read more ]

Quantum entanglement between the electron clouds of nucleic acids in DNA

Rieper, Anders and Vedral modelled the electron clouds of nucleic acids in a single strand of DNA as a chain of coupled quantum harmonic oscillators with dipole-dipole interaction between nearest neighbours. As a main result, the entanglement contained in the chain coincides with the binding energy

[ read more ]

Variation in cancer risk among tissues can be explained by the number of stem cell divisions

Tomasetti and Vogelstein show that the lifetime risk of cancers of many different types is strongly correlated with the total number of divisions of the normal self-renewing cells maintaining that tissue’s homeostasis. These results suggest that only a third of the variation in cancer risk among t

[ read more ]

About metabolism of a carcinoma cell

Most cancer cells utilize aerobic glycolysis irrespective of their tissue of origin. The alteration from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis – called the Warburg effect – is an universal phenomen and has now become a diagnostic tool for cancer detection. Warburg O, Posener K, Negelein E.

[ read more ]

A Mitochondrial Paradigm of Metabolic and Degenerative Diseases, Aging, and Cancer: A Dawn for Evolutionary Medicine

Progressive increase in mtDNA 3243A>G heteroplasmy causes abrupt transcriptional reprogramming Wallace hypothesized mitochondrial dysfunction as a central role in a wide range of age-related disorders and various forms of cancer. Steadily rising increases in mitochondrial DNA mutations cause abr

[ read more ]

Ganzes Musikalbum wird auf DNA archiviert

Mit an der ETH Zürich entwickelter Technologie wird zum ersten Mal die Tonspur eines ganzen Musikalbums in Form von genetischer Information gespeichert. Codiert auf DNA-Molekülen und in Glaskügelchen eingegossen, wird ein Album der Musikgruppe Massive Attack damit praktisch für die Ewigkeit erhalten bleiben. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Gene-edited stem cells show promise against HIV in non-human primates

Gene editing of bone marrow stem cells in pigtail macaques infected with simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) significantly reduces the size of dormant ‚viral reservoirs‘ that pose a risk of reactivation. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

Researchers explore little-known, deadly fungal infections

A new study sheds light on little-known fungal infections caused by the fungus Cryptococcus. There are currently no vaccines available for any fungal infection, which can be extremely deadly to patients under treatment for diseases like HIV, AIDS and cancer. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

Deutliche menschliche Belastung der Umwelt bereits in der Bronzezeit nachweisbar

„Frühes Anthropozän“ in Eisbohrkernen nachgewiesen

Die von Menschen verursachten Eingriffe in die Umwelt und einhergehende Umweltverschmutzung hat dazu geführt, dass wir vom Anthropozän, einem neuen geologischen Zeitalter sprechen. Geowissenschaftler der Universität Wien und der Universität für Bodenkultur Wien haben mittels Archivanalysen herausgefunden, dass der menschliche Einfluss auf die Umwelt schon wesentlich früher begonnen hat, als bisher angenommen. Die erhöhte Konzentration von Schwermetallen in Eisbohrkernen deutet auf ein „Frühes Anthropozän“ ab der Bronzezeit hin. Die Ergebnisse dazu sind kürzlich in der Fachzeitschrift „The Anthropocene Review“ erschienen. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

HIV im südlichen Afrika: Test und Behandlungsstart zuhause erhöht Therapieerfolg

HIV-Tests zuhause und sofortiger Beginn der Behandlung mit antiretroviraler HIV-Therapie erhöhen die Zahl therapierter PatientInnen und den Behandlungserfolg. Das zeigt eine klinische Studie in Lesotho, die das Schweizerische Tropen- und Public Health-Institut mit dem Schweizer Hilfswerk SolidarMed und der Regierung von Lesotho durchgeführt hat. Die heute in der renommierten Zeitschrift Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) publizierten Resultate sind wegweisend für künftige Behandlungsstrategien von HIV/Aids im südlichen Afrika. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

HIV in sub-Sahara Africa: Testing and treatment start at home improves therapy

Home-based HIV testing and prompt treatment with antiretroviral therapy increases the number of patients under treatment as well as treatment success. This is the key result of a clinical trial in Lesotho carried out by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, in collaboration with SolidarMed and the Government of Lesotho. The results published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) lead the way for future treatment strategies against HIV/AIDS in sub-Sahara Africa. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

How viruses disarm the immune system

How do viruses that cause chronic infections, such as HIV or hepatitis c virus, manage to outsmart their hosts‘ immune systems? The answer to that question has long eluded scientists, but new research has uncovered a molecular mechanism that may be a key piece of the puzzle. The discovery could provide new targets for treating a wide range of diseases. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

Warum infizierte Affen kein AIDS entwickeln: Unterschied zum Immunsystem des Menschen entdeckt

Einige Affenarten entwickeln niemals eine Immunschwäche, obwohl sie mit einem engen Verwandten des AIDS-Erregers infiziert sind. Eine internationale Forschergruppe hat nun molekulare Unterschiede zum menschlichen Immunsystem identifiziert, die das „friedliche Zusammenleben“ der Affen mit dem Virus erklären könnten. Diese Erkenntnisse haben die Virologen, darunter Prof. Frank Kirchhoff und Juniorprofessor Daniel Sauter aus Ulm, in der hochrenommierten Fachzeitschrift „Nature“ veröffentlicht. Sie könnten auf längere Sicht dazu beitragen, die HIV-Therapie beim Menschen zu verbessern. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Gene therapy using CAR T-cells could provide long-term protection against HIV

Through gene therapy, researchers engineered blood-forming stem cells (hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, or HSPCs) to carry chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) genes to make cells that can detect and destroy HIV-infected cells. These engineered cells persisted for more than two years. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

Bioengineers imagine the future of vaccines and immunotherapy

In the not-too-distant future, nanoparticles delivered to a cancer patient’s immune cells might teach the cells to destroy tumors. A flu vaccine might look and feel like applying a small, round bandage to your skin. These are examples of how innovative biomaterials could enhance vaccines against HIV and other infectious diseases and immunotherapies for patients with cancer or dampen responses in autoimmune disorders, allergies and transplanted organ recipients. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

Cancer news

Embryonic mammary gland stem cells identified

22. Mai. 2018

Scientists have identified the mechanisms that regulate mammary gland development. Using a combination of lineage tracing, molecular profiling, single cell sequencing and functional experiments, they have demonstrated that mammary gland initially develops from multipotent progenitors during the early steps of embryonic mammary gland morphogenesis whereas postnatal mammary gland development is mediated by lineage-restricted stem cells. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

New data changes the way scientists explain how cancer tumors develop

21. Mai. 2018

A collaborative research team has uncovered new information that more accurately explains how cancerous tumors grow within the body. This study is currently available in Nature Genetics. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

Deep space radiation treatment reboots brain’s immune system

21. Mai. 2018

NASA and private company SpaceX plan to send humans to Mars within the next 15 years — but need to figure out how to protect astronauts from the dangerous cosmic radiation of deep space. Now neuroscientists have identified a potential treatment for the brain damage caused by cosmic rays — a drug that prevents memory impairment in mice exposed to simulated space radiation. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

Are humans causing cancer in wild animals?

21. Mai. 2018

As humans, we know that some of our activities can cause cancer to develop in our bodies. Smoking, poor diets, pollution, chemicals used as additives in food and personal hygiene products, and even too much sun can contribute to an increased risk of cancer. But, are human activities also causing cancer in wild animals? Researchers think so and are urgently calling for research into this topic. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

Scientist reveals likely cause of childhood leukemia

21. Mai. 2018

A major new analysis reveals for the first time the likely cause of most cases of childhood leukemia, following more than a century of controversy about its origins. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

Fewer men are being screened, diagnosed, and treated for prostate cancer

21. Mai. 2018

A new study reveals declines in prostate cancer screening and diagnoses in the United States in recent years, as well as decreases in the use of definitive treatments in men who have been diagnosed. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

MR spectroscopy imaging reveals effects of targeted treatment of mutant IDH1 gliomas

18. Mai. 2018

Using a novel imaging method, a research team is investigating the mechanisms behind a potential targeted treatment for a subtype of the deadly brains tumors called gliomas. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

A way to prevent pancreatic cancer from spreading post-surgery?

17. Mai. 2018

New research suggests a strategy for lowering the odds of metastasis following successful pancreatic cancer surgery: The post-operative period, suggests a researcher, ‚offers a window during which efforts might be made to keep cortisol levels down and T cells strong so the patient’s own immune system can kill the cancer cells that have made their way to other parts of the body but until this point have been dormant.‘ (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

Immune cell provides cradle for mammary stem cells

17. Mai. 2018

Researchers have made new discoveries about how an immune cell known as the macrophage, which normally fights infection by swallowing foreign invaders, nurtures mammary gland stem cells through a chemical signaling molecule. The study may provide important clues about the roles of macrophages in breast cancer progression. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

Single surface protein boosts multiple oncogenic pathways in acute myeloid leukemia

17. Mai. 2018

Researchers have discovered that a signaling protein elevated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) plays a much wider role in the disease than previously thought. The study raises hopes that current efforts to target this signaling protein could be a successful strategy to treat AML and other blood cancers. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

La Trobe’s infection-busting discovery

17. Mai. 2018

Scientists have shown a protein found in a tobacco plant has the potential to fight life-threatening infectious diseases. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

Individualized ovarian, brain cancer therapies

16. Mai. 2018

Researchers have discovered that a molecular communication pathway — thought to be defective in cancer — is a key player in determining the effectiveness of measles virus oncolytic cancer treatment in ovarian and aggressive brain cancers. This discovery enabled researchers to develop an algorithm to predict treatment effectiveness in individual patients. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

Diagnosing breast cancer with an imaging pill

16. Mai. 2018

For women, mammograms are a sometimes uncomfortable, but necessary, annual ritual. But this procedure doesn’t always provide accurate results, and it exposes women to X-rays. In a new study, scientists report that they have developed a non-invasive ‚disease screening pill‘ that can make cancerous tumors light up when exposed to near-infrared light in mice without using radiation. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

Cell type switch helps colon cancer evade treatment, study suggests

16. Mai. 2018

Researchers have discovered that colon cancers are often resistant to existing drug treatments because they are composed of two different cell types that can replace each other when one cell type is killed. The study suggests that combination therapies targeting both cell types at once may be more effective at treating colorectal cancer, the third highest cause of cancer-related death in the United States. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

Taming random gene changes as our bodies start to form

15. Mai. 2018

Scientists exploring how to tame random gene fluctuations as the embryos that become our bodies start to form have identified a control switch in the vertebrate segmentation clock of developing zebrafish. The researchers report their findings could uncover methods for modulating genetic signals to prevent birth defects or cancers rooted at the earliest stages of development. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

Different diseases elicit distinct sets of exhausted T cells

15. Mai. 2018

The battle between the human immune system and long-term, persisting infections and other chronic diseases such as cancer results in a prolonged stalemate. Over time battle-weary T cells become exhausted, giving germs or tumors an edge. Using data from multiple molecular databases, researchers have found nine distinct types of exhausted T cells, which could have implications for fighting chronic infections, autoimmunity, and cancer. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

First clues to the causes of multiple sclerosis

15. Mai. 2018

There is still no cure for multiple sclerosis, with current treatments largely based on managing symptoms, especially accelerating recovery phases following a relapse and reducing the number and severity of relapses. Researchers have now identified a DNA-binding factor called TOX that might play a role in triggering multiple sclerosis. They found that TOX license immune cells to cause autoimmune tissue destruction in the brain. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

- Read more

Veranstaltungen

102. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Pathologie e.V.

23. Mai. 2018

Vom 24. bis 26. Mai 2018 tagt die Deutsche Gesellschaft für Pathologie e.V. (DGP) in Berlin zum 102. Mal. Auch in diesem Jahr sind die Beiträge auf der Tagung durch die bahnbrechenden Entwicklungen im Bereich der Molekularpathologie und den Einzug digitaler Techniken in den Arbeitsalltag der Pathologinnen und Pathologen geprägt. Dieser Trend hat auch im besonderen Maße Einfluss auf die Schwerpunkte des Kongresses: Tumorevolution und Tumorheterogenität sowie seltene Erkrankungen. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

- Weiterlesen

12. COMPAMED Frühjahrsforum

02. Mai. 2018

Implantate in der Medizintechnik (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

- Weiterlesen

Gesundheit damals und heute: «Receptirkünste» im Wandel der Zeit

02. Mai. 2018

Pharmaziehistorisches Forum des Departements Chemie und Angewandte Biowissenschaften der ETH Zürich in Kooperation mit dem Pharmaziemuseum der Universität Basel (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

- Weiterlesen

From Synapses to Circuits in Health and Disease

02. Mai. 2018

6. Inter-Academy Symposium (IAS) der Leopoldina und der Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

- Weiterlesen

Digitalisierung & Big Data als Treiber für ein patienten- und outcome-orientiertes Gesundheitswesen

02. Mai. 2018

E-Health-Gesetz, elektronische Patientenakte, Big-Data – Der Gesundheitsbranche steht mit der Digitalisierung ein radikaler Wandel bevor. Digitale Instrumente und Interaktionen verändern die gesamte „Patientenreise“ – mit erheblichen Potenzialen und Herausforderungen für alle Akteure! (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

- Weiterlesen

Die neuen EU-Verordnungen für Medizinprodukte & IVD

02. Mai. 2018

Insgesamt 3 Termine: 08.05.2018 von 14:00 bis 17:00 Uhr 14.06.2018 von 09:30 bis 16:30 Uhr 18.07.2018 von 09:30 bis 16:30 Uhr Wir laden Sie ein, sich die neuen EU-Verordnungen für Medizinprodukte & IVD gemeinsam mit dem Experten DI Martin Schmid in einer Gruppe Gleichgesinnter zu erarbeiten.

Wir erstellen Formulare, Checklisten, Leitfäden für die neue Medizinprodukte-Verordnung. Alle erstellten Unterlagen werden gemeinsam diskutiert und durch en.co.tec-Know-how qualitätsgesichert. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

- Weiterlesen

Das Babel-Projekt I – Epistemische Funktionen von Metaphern im wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnisprozess

02. Mai. 2018

Unsere Wahrnehmung der Welt und der wissenschaftliche Zugang zu ihrer kausalen Struktur sind wesentlich mit dem Gebrauch von Sprache – insbesondere Metaphern – verbunden. Metaphern erfüllen epistemische Funktionen, indem sie durch die Anlehnung an einen bekannten Quellbereich eine speziell geartete Vorstellung eines neuen, abstrakteren Konzeptes (Zielbereich) vermitteln. Sie sind somit auch für die Neukonstruktion und Artikulation von Theorien und Begriffen bedeutsam. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

- Weiterlesen