Mitochondria and the evolutionary roots of cancer

Cancer is a group of almost 200 diseases that involve variety of changes in cell structure, morphology, and physiology. Cancer phenotype is underlying several alterations in cellular dynamics with three most critical features, which includes self-sufficiency in growth signals and insensitivity to in

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A new theory of the origin of cancer: quantum coherent entanglement, centrioles, mitosis, and differentiation

Low non-specific, low intensity laser illumination (635, 670 or 830 nm) apparently enhances centriole replication and promotes cell division, what is the opposite of a desired cancer therapy. In the contrary, centrioles are sensitive to coherent light. Then higher intensity laser illumination - stil

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About metabolism of a carcinoma cell

Most cancer cells utilize aerobic glycolysis irrespective of their tissue of origin. The alteration from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis – called the Warburg effect – is an universal phenomen and has now become a diagnostic tool for cancer detection. Warburg O, Posener K, Negelein E.

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A Mitochondrial Paradigm of Metabolic and Degenerative Diseases, Aging, and Cancer: A Dawn for Evolutionary Medicine

Progressive increase in mtDNA 3243A>G heteroplasmy causes abrupt transcriptional reprogramming Wallace hypothesized mitochondrial dysfunction as a central role in a wide range of age-related disorders and various forms of cancer. Steadily rising increases in mitochondrial DNA mutations cause abr

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Wholeness and implicate order: “Deep” quantum chemistry and cell consciousness: quantum chemistry controls genes and biochemistry to give cells and higher organism’s consciousness and complex behavior

Bohm used the term ‘holomovement’ which is an unbroken and undivided totality and carries an implicate order which is he totality of an order including both the manifested and non-manifested aspects of the order. Non-local quantum phenomena reside in a subtler level than quantum level that is th

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Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life

Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling is being of vital imp

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Implications of quantum metabolism and natural selection for the origin of cancer cells and tumor progression

Energy transfer in material solids is driven primarily by differences in intensive thermodynamic quantities such as pressure and temperature. The crucial observation  in quantum-theoretical models was the consideration of the heat capacity as associated with the vibrations of atoms in a crystalline

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Quantum Teleportation and Von Neumann Entropy

From the aspect of the quantum information theories, various quantum entropies are possibly computed at each stage, which ensures the emergence of the entangled states in the intermediate step. If a single qubit quantum teleportation is near the computational basis, the quantum measurement is domina

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Quantum entanglement between the electron clouds of nucleic acids in DNA

Rieper, Anders and Vedral modelled the electron clouds of nucleic acids in a single strand of DNA as a chain of coupled quantum harmonic oscillators with dipole-dipole interaction between nearest neighbours. As a main result, the entanglement contained in the chain coincides with the binding energy

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Variation in cancer risk among tissues can be explained by the number of stem cell divisions

Tomasetti and Vogelstein show that the lifetime risk of cancers of many different types is strongly correlated with the total number of divisions of the normal self-renewing cells maintaining that tissue’s homeostasis. These results suggest that only a third of the variation in cancer risk among t

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Animals and fungi enhance the performance of forests.

Leipzig, Halle. A new study shows that, in addition to the diversity of tree species, the variety of animal and fungus species also has a decisive influence on the performance of forests. Forest performance comprises many facets besides timber production, such as carbon storage and climate regulation. The study is based on ten years of research in species-rich subtropical forests. A team of researchers led by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg has published the results in the new issue of Nature Communications. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Potential new drugs from previously unknown tropical fungus

New substances are showing antagonistic activity towards roundworms and germs (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Researchers explore little-known, deadly fungal infections

A new study sheds light on little-known fungal infections caused by the fungus Cryptococcus. There are currently no vaccines available for any fungal infection, which can be extremely deadly to patients under treatment for diseases like HIV, AIDS and cancer. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

DSMZ is Europe’s first Registered Collection

The Leibniz Institute DSMZ is the first biological resource center ever to be entered in the European register of collections, that meet the requirements of the Nagoya Protocol. Customers who order a bacterial strain, fungus, or other microorganism from the DSMZ can be assured they have met the due diligence requirements of the Nagoya Protocol. The Nagoya Protocol has made it considerably more difficult for science to work with biological resources. Many underestimate the additional effort of obtaining Nagoya-related permissions. The DSMZ now relieves its customers of precisely that additional effort. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

[…]

Moulds produce plant growth hormone

Kiel research team describes the auxin synthesis mechanisms in the fungus Neurospora crassa for the first time

Plants, bacteria and various fungi produce a specific group of hormones known as auxins. Together with other hormones, they cause plant cells to stretch and thus, for example, the rapid growth of young shoots. The manner in which plants produce these substances has been intensively studied for decades, and is accordingly described in great detail. In contrast, how this biosynthesis takes place in fungi has hardly been studied to date. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Emerging infectious disease threatens Darwin’s frog with extinction

Iconic species likely to be wiped-out by amphibian fungus, despite lack of obvious short-term evidence. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Action Required: Invasive Fungus Is Killing European Salamanders

A new fungal disease brought in from Asia is threatening European salamanders. Once the amphibians become infected, they die within a brief period of time, as biologists of the Universities of Zurich and Ghent have shown. Because saving the infected populations is still not possible, Switzerland has preventively imposed an import ban for salamanders and newts. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

With a little help from my fungus: fungus increases resistance of tomato plants against worms

Leipzig/Jena. Plants are constantly challenged by hungry animals and infectious microbes. Tomato plants, for example, are often infested with little worms that feed on their roots. A fungus can help them to better defend themselves against these attacks, scientists report in the journal New Phytologist. In the future, farmers and gardeners might benefit from the new findings, as they may be able to use a kind of ‚fungus-vaccination‘ to prepare their tomato plants for impeding an infestation with worms. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

University of Graz researchers challenge 140-year-old paradigm of lichen symbiosis

Lichens have long been a classic example of symbiosis. Now, that dualistic relationship between an alga and a fungus is being challenged. Together with colleagues from the USA and Sweden, researchers of the University of Graz have shown that some of the world’s most common lichen species are actually composed of not one but two fungi. These findings will be the cover story in the July 29th issue of the journal Science. (Mehr in: Pressemitteilungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

Fungus a possible precursor of severe respiratory diseases in pigs

The fungus Pneumocystis carinii causes mild forms of progressive pneumonia in pigs. It has therefore not been considered to be of high diagnostic relevance. A team from Vetmeduni Vienna has now shown this pathogen to be very prevalent among Austrian pigs, indicating that its role has so far been underestimated. Pneumocystis appears to be a sort of “door opener” for secondary bacterial infections. The researchers also show lung lavages to be an effective and relatively stress-free method for detecting the fungus in time. The results were published in two studies in the journals The Veterinary Journal and Journal of Veterinary […]

Cancer news

Chemicals found in vegetables prevent colon cancer in mice

14. Aug. 2018

Chemicals produced by vegetables such as kale, cabbage and broccoli could help to maintain a healthy gut and prevent colon cancer, a new study shows. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Zombie gene protects against cancer — in elephants

14. Aug. 2018

LIF6, a dead gene that came back to life, prevents cancer by killing cells with DNA damage. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Potential guidance for gastric cancer treatment

14. Aug. 2018

Researchers have discovered that gastric cancer tissue samples bearing mutation of a specific gene, MUC16, too are associated with higher tumor mutation loads. Also known as tumor mutation burdens, measurement of high genetic mutation rates among cancerous versus healthy tissue has increasingly been shown to correlate with effective response rates to immunotherapy. The knowledge could bode positively for patients with the biomarker present. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Cancer-fighting drugs also help plants fight disease

14. Aug. 2018

Cancer-fighting drugs used on humans can help plants fight disease as well. That discovery, by plant pathologists, could help scientists develop new pathways for plants to battle infection. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Stress hormone is key factor in failure of immune system to prevent leukemia

14. Aug. 2018

The human stress hormone cortisol has been identified as a key factor when the immune system fails to prevent leukemia taking hold. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Cetuximab+RT found to be inferior to standard treatment in HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer

14. Aug. 2018

An interim analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial of patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal cancer found that treatment with radiation therapy and cetuximab is associated with worse overall and progression-free survival compared to the current standard treatment with radiation and cisplatin. The trial was designed to see if cetuximab with radiation would be less toxic than cisplatin with radiation without compromising survival for patients with the disease. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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E-cigarette vapor disables key immune cells in the lung and boosts inflammation

14. Aug. 2018

E-cigarette vapor boosts the production of inflammatory chemicals and disables key protective cells in the lung that keep the air spaces clear of potentially harmful particles, reveals a small experimental study. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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First study on physical properties of giant cancer cells may inform new treatments

13. Aug. 2018

Giant cancer cells are much larger and stiffer than other cancer cells and move further, study shows. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Specialized delivery methods to help treat cancer, other disorders

13. Aug. 2018

More than 100 years ago, German Nobel laureate Paul Ehrlich popularized the ‚magic bullet‘ concept — a method that clinicians might one day use to target invading microbes without harming other parts of the body. Although chemotherapies have been highly useful as targeted treatments for cancer, unwanted side effects still plague patients. Now, researchers have demonstrated that specialized nucleic acid-based nanostructures could be used to target cancer cells while bypassing normal cells. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Medical testing: Drop the C-word to reduce anxiety and overtreatment

13. Aug. 2018

Medical researchers are calling for the word ‚cancer‘ to be dropped from some doctor-patient conversations in a bid to reduce patient anxiety and harm from over treatment. The appeal follows mounting evidence that patients who are told they have ‚cancer‘ for low risk conditions more often choose surgery than those whose condition is described with terms such as ‚lesions‘ or ‚abnormal cells‘. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Missing immune cells that could fight lethal brain tumors

13. Aug. 2018

Researchers have tracked the missing T-cells in glioblastoma patients. They found them in abundance in the bone marrow, locked away and unable to function because of a process the brain stimulates in response to glioblastoma, to other tumors that metastasize in the brain and even to injury. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Blood test could detect kidney cancer up to 5 years earlier

13. Aug. 2018

Scientists have discovered that a marker in the blood could help predict the risk that a person will develop kidney cancer. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Disrupted nitrogen metabolism might spell cancer

13. Aug. 2018

Researchers have now shown that in many cancers, the patient’s nitrogen metabolism is altered, producing detectable changes in the body fluids and contributing to the emergence of new mutations in cancerous tissue. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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‚Undruggable‘ cancers slowed by targeting growth signals

13. Aug. 2018

As many as 50 percent of human cancer cases — across a wide variety of tissues — involve defects in a common cellular growth signaling pathway. These defects have so far defied most attempts to develop targeted therapies. Now researchers have identified a new strategy for potentially treating intractable cancers by decoupling the entire RAS/MAP Kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway from external growth signals. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Doctor-patient discussions neglect potential harms of lung cancer screening, study finds

13. Aug. 2018

Although national guidelines advise doctors to discuss the benefits and harms of lung cancer screening with high-risk patients because of a high rate of false positives and other factors, those conversations aren’t happening the way they should be, according to a new study. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Major new vulnerability of childhood leukemia uncovered

13. Aug. 2018

A team of researchers has recently uncovered a major new vulnerability of mixed lineage leukemia. Their findings demonstrate that a protein called LEDGF/p75 is regulated by phosphorylation, a molecular modification that changes the electrical charge of the LEDGF/p75 protein. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Wearable ‚microbrewery‘ saves human body from radiation damage

09. Aug. 2018

The same way that yeast yields beer and bread can help hospital lab workers better track their daily radiation exposure, enabling a faster assessment of tissue damage that could lead to cancer. (Mehr in: Cancer News — ScienceDaily)

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Veranstaltungen

10. TWINCORE Symposium – Frontiers in translational infection research

01. Aug. 2018

Am 31. August 2018 begrüßen wir zum 10. Mal Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler asu der ganzen Welt zum TWINCORE Symposium. Internationale Experten führen durch aktuelle Entwicklungen der translationalen Infektionsforschung.

http://www.twincore.de/twincore/

Nähere Informationen folgen… (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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OSTSEETAG

01. Aug. 2018

Wer Ostsee-Expertenwissen braucht, ist hier richtig: 3. Ostseetag im Stadthafen Rostock! (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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Klinische Bewertung medizinischer Software

01. Aug. 2018

Für jedes Medizinprodukt muss der Hersteller anhand klinischer Daten die Eignung für die vorgesehene Verwendung nachweisen und die klinischen Risiken vor dem Hintergrund des zu erwartenden Nutzens für den Patienten bewerten. Dies ist ein kontinuierlicher Prozess, der sich bis zur klinischen Nachbeobachtung nach dem Inverkehrbringen erstreckt. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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„Blue Biotechnology in the Baltic Sea Region – from Science to Business“

01. Aug. 2018

Es ist uns eine große Freude, Sie zu der internationalen Konferenz „Blue Biotechnology in the Baltic Sea Region – from Science to Business“ einzuladen. Rund 100 Wissenschaftler, Unternehmer und Interessenvertreter aus dem Umfeld der marinen Biotechnologie werden vom 22. bis zum 24. August 2018 neueste Resultate aus Forschung und Entwicklung sowie erfolgreiche ökonomische Umsetzungen präsentieren. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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12th International Conference and Workshop on Biological Barriers

01. Aug. 2018

Biological Barriers is an international scientific event , organized every two years and receiving constantly 200+ registered attendees from all over the world. In the focus of BioBarriers are human cell and tissue models for facilitating clinical translation of new drugs and delivery systems, especially in the context of infectious diseases. Moreover, we will discuss innovative concepts and materials, also capable to overcome non-cellular diffusion barriers such as mucus or bacterial biofilms. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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Die Rettung des Nördlichen Breitmaulnashorns

01. Jul. 2018

Wir, das Leibniz-Institut für Zoo- und Wildtierforschung (Leibniz-IZW), laden Sie herzlich zur Pressekonferenz anlässlich der bahnbrechenden Fortschritte in unserem internationalen Forschungsprojekt ein. Wir präsentieren Ihnen die Inhalte einer NATURE COMMUNICATIONS-Publikation. Die Veranstaltung wird vom Springer Nature Verlag moderiert. Als Gäste sind Herr Prof. Dr. Matthias Kleiner, Präsident der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft, und Frau Nina Ruge, UN-Dekade Botschafterin, angefragt. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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build.well.being 2018. A Digital Healthcare Networking Event

01. Jul. 2018

Die Veranstaltung build.well.being am 29. Juni 2018 an der FH St. Pölten stellt innovative Ansätze für das digitalen Gesundheitswesen vor. Das Networking-Event für UmsetzerInnen zeigt konkrete Projekte an der Schnittstelle von Gesundheit und Technik. In knappen drei Stunden präsentieren Studierende und ForscherInnen Streiflichter aus aktueller Praxis und Forschung. Die Veranstaltung richtet sich an Spezialistinnen und Spezialisten im Bereich Digital Healthcare sowie an alle Interessierten. (Mehr in: Veranstaltungen – idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft)

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